caution

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caution (one) about (someone or something)

To warn one about someone or something. My mom always cautions me about the dangers of texting while driving. You need to caution him about Allie before he falls prey to her usual tricks.
See also: caution

caution (one) against (someone or something)

To warn one about someone or something. My mom always cautions me against texting while driving. You need to caution him against Allie before he falls prey to her usual tricks.
See also: caution

err on the side of caution

To avoid risky or irresponsible behavior; to be very cautious. I like to err on the side of caution and always keep some money in my savings account. Since we don't know where we're going, let's err on the side of caution and leave an hour early.
See also: caution, err, of, on, side

out of an abundance of caution

In an earnest attempt to ensure that any potential danger, risks, or problems are avoided. Out of an abundance of caution, I always make sure I have enough money to cover six months' worth of expenses in my savings account, in case anything ever happened to my job. We believe that the allergic reaction was specific to that patient's genetic makeup, but we've also temporarily stopped administering the drug at that dose out of an abundance of caution.
See also: caution, of, out

throw caution to the wind(s)

To abandon one's cautiousness in order to take a risk. You can't live life completely reserved, you know. You've got to throw caution to the wind every now and then. After my father won a bit of money at the race tracks, he began throwing caution to the winds and gambling everything we had there.
See also: caution, throw, to

toss caution to the wind(s)

To abandon one's cautiousness in order to take a risk. You can't live life completely reserved, you know. You've got to toss caution to the wind every now and then. After my father won a bit of money at the race tracks, he began tossing caution to the winds and gambling everything we had there.
See also: caution, to, toss
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

caution someone about someone or something

 and caution someone against someone or something
to warn someone against someone or something. Haven't I cautioned you about that before? Hasn't someone cautioned you about Daniel?
See also: caution

throw caution to the wind

Cliché to become very careless. Jane, who is usually cautious, threw caution to the wind and went swimming in the ocean. I don't mind taking a little chance now and then, but I'm not the type of person who throws caution to the wind.
See also: caution, throw, to, wind
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

throw caution to the winds

Also, throw discretion to the winds. Behave or speak very rashly, as in Throwing caution to the winds, he ran after the truck, or I'm afraid she's thrown discretion to the winds and told everyone about the divorce. This expression uses to the winds in the sense of "utterly vanishing" or "out of existence," a usage dating from the mid-1600s. The first recorded use of throw to the winds was in 1885.
See also: caution, throw, to, wind
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

err on the side of caution

COMMON If you err on the side of caution, you decide to act in a careful way, rather than take risks. It is better on your first few weights sessions to err on the side of caution, and start with a weight which is lighter than you think you can handle. Note: People use other words instead of caution, according to the subject they are discussing. When I discussed the matter with ministers in July I said that we should err on the side of generosity.
See also: caution, err, of, on, side

throw caution to the wind

or

throw caution to the winds

COMMON If you throw caution to the wind or throw caution to the winds, you do something without worrying about the risks and danger involved. Perhaps I should throw caution to the wind, give up my job and just go travelling. This was no time to think, he decided. He threw caution to the winds and rang the bell of the ground-floor flat.
See also: caution, throw, to, wind
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

throw caution to the wind (or winds)

act in a completely reckless manner.
See also: caution, throw, to, wind
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

throw caution to the ˈwind(s)

(often humorous) stop caring about how dangerous something might be; start taking risks: I decided to throw caution to the winds and buy myself a really expensive pair of shoes.He threw caution to the wind and dived in after the child. OPPOSITE: tread carefully, warily, etc.
See also: caution, throw, to, wind
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
It went on: ``There was insufficient evidence to suggest that restorative cautioning was more effective than traditional cautioning in terms of reducing resanctioning rates.
``There was also no evidence that restorative cautioning had increased resanctioning rates.
A Home Office report said so-called `restorative cautioning', in which offenders apologise to their victims, had little effect on reconviction rates.
Where the police have previously been cautioning people there now has to be a presumption of prosecution.
The cautioning of criminals, rather than formally charging them with offences, has long been a discredited arm of this country's namby-pamby law enforcement policy.
"Cautioning offenders for low level crimes should in no way be seen as a soft option but as good common sense policing.
"There is every likelihood that by cautioning someone they are just going to go out and do it again, especially if they feel all they're going to get is a caution."
''With hindsight, the cautioning of this man, although done with the best of intentions, was probably not the most appropriate action and this is rightly reflected by the High Court's decision.''
He said: "I am afraid I cannot accept the main contention of the claimant's case of no admission prior to the cautioning procedure.
Judge Neil Bidder refused Mr Francis' case for judicial review, saying: "I am afraid I cannot accept the main contention of the claimant's case of no admission prior to the cautioning procedure."