cat

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cat

1. n. a fellow; a guy; a dude. Now, this cat wants to borrow some money from me. What should I do?
2. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Looks like somebody catted in the bushes.
3. n. a gossipy woman. Mary can be such a cat, you know.
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References in classic literature ?
Anne "shooed," but the cat would not "shoo." As long as she stood he sat back on his haunches and gazed at her reproachfully out of his one good eye; when she resumed her walk he followed.
How can four unprotected females get rid of a cat who won't be got rid of?"
`If it had grown up,' she said to herself, `it would have made a dreadfully ugly child: but it makes rather a handsome pig, I think.' And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, `if one only knew the right way to change them--' when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.
`That depends a good deal on where you want to get to,' said the Cat.
There was in London at that time popular a song, a comic, vulgar song of the 'Alls, 'The Cat Came Back'.
You will remember, isn't it, the cat belonging to the American woman in the hotel at Paris, of which you have spoken to me?
She dropped the veil over her face--and, followed by her train of cats, glided out of the room.
"Surely you wouldn't prefer me to tell them that cats DO go to heaven," protested Uncle Blair.
The great cat lay crouched upon a thick limb, hidden from the ape's view by dense foliage, waiting patiently until the anthropoid should come within range of his spring.
The kind Mouse agreed, but the Cat slunk under the town wall to the church, and ate up half of the pot of fat.
"No one can regret more than I the fact that you made me," asserted the cat, crouching upon the floor and slowly swaying its spun-glass tail from side to side.
Struck in mid-air, a trifle of a flying machine, all its delicate gears tangled and disrupted, Cocky fell to the floor in a shower of white feathers, which, like snowflakes, eddied slowly down after, and after the plummet-like descent of the cat, so that some of them came to rest on her back, startling her tense nerves with their gentle impact and making her crouch closer while she shot a swift glance around and overhead for any danger that might threaten.
"Look at me," said the Cat. "For the same foolish reason, I have lost the sight of both eyes."
'I've delivered your cat,' he continued, 'from the hands, or rather the gun, of Mr.
The sun got round behind the wood, and it was quite late in the afternoon; but still the cat sat upon the basket.