cat

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cat

1. n. a fellow; a guy; a dude. Now, this cat wants to borrow some money from me. What should I do?
2. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Looks like somebody catted in the bushes.
3. n. a gossipy woman. Mary can be such a cat, you know.
See:
References in classic literature ?
You take the cat in the morning and give him a good breakfast.
He's my cat -- and you've just got to make the best of it.
And she began thinking over other children she knew, who might do very well as pigs, and was just saying to herself, `if one only knew the right way to change them--' when she was a little startled by seeing the Cheshire Cat sitting on a bough of a tree a few yards off.
There was in London at that time popular a song, a comic, vulgar song of the 'Alls, 'The Cat Came Back'.
She dropped the veil over her face--and, followed by her train of cats, glided out of the room.
Surely you wouldn't prefer me to tell them that cats DO go to heaven," protested Uncle Blair.
He would have preferred to use his noose, but the foliage surrounding the huge cat precluded the possibility of an accurate throw with the rope.
Oh, you sit at home in your dark grey coat and your long tail,' said the Cat, 'and you get fanciful.
That is because I gave you different brains from those we ourselves possess--and much too good for a cat," returned Dr.
Struck in mid-air, a trifle of a flying machine, all its delicate gears tangled and disrupted, Cocky fell to the floor in a shower of white feathers, which, like snowflakes, eddied slowly down after, and after the plummet-like descent of the cat, so that some of them came to rest on her back, startling her tense nerves with their gentle impact and making her crouch closer while she shot a swift glance around and overhead for any danger that might threaten.
In the twinkling of an eyelid, the Cat leaped on him, and ate him, feathers and all.
Finding everything still, he marched into the kitchen, and groped about till he found a match in order to light a candle; and then, espying the glittering fiery eyes of the cat, he mistook them for live coals, and held the match to them to light it.
He was by when I rescued Nancy's cat, and did not quite approve of the deed.
Just at that moment they heard the cry of a pack of hounds coming towards them, and the Cat immediately scampered up a tree and hid herself in the boughs.
The sun got round behind the wood, and it was quite late in the afternoon; but still the cat sat upon the basket.