catch

(redirected from catch themselves)

catch

1. verb To see, and perhaps apprehend, someone in the act of doing something (often something nefarious). The robbers were arrested when the police caught them looting another house. I don't watch to catch you kids doing this ever again—the tool shed is far too dangerous to play in!
2. verb, slang To see or hear a specific program or event, typically as broadcast on the TV or radio. Did you catch the game last night? What a crazy ending!
3. verb To hear and/or understand something that has been said. I'm sorry, I didn't catch that last part. Can you repeat it?
4. verb To contract a contagious illness. All of my students are sick right now, so I'm not surprised that I've caught a cold, too. With the way you've been sneezing all day, I really hope I don't catch what you have!
5. verb To encounter or meet with someone, typically for the purpose of communicating with them. This usage often suggests that the person is busy or rushed, and therefore may have limited availability. Hey, I'm glad I caught you—how's your mom doing? Peg has to sign off on your expense report, so be sure to catch her before she leaves the office. I'll catch you later, man.
6. verb To receive a punishment or reprimand. The phrase "catch it" is usually used for this usage. If I get home past curfew again, I'm really going to catch it from my parents!
7. verb To notice a problem, error, or inconsistency, often one that is inconspicuous. Oh, Jen caught that spelling error—I never even noticed it.
8. verb To notice or detect something. Did you catch the joke at the beginning of the movie? It was pretty subtle. I opened the window and caught a whiff of dinner cooking next door.
9. verb In baseball or softball, to play the position of catcher. Joe is sick, so we need someone else to catch tonight.
10. verb To reach a mode of transportation before it departs. Of course we hit a major traffic jam when I have a plane to catch! Oh, she did catch the bus—the driver saw her running and waited for her.
11. verb To stop oneself from doing something. In this usage, "catch" is followed by a reflexive pronoun. Bill tripped over the step but managed to catch himself on the railing before falling. I almost asked about her boyfriend when I caught myself, remembering that they had broken up.
12. noun A game in which two or more people throw a ball back and forth between them. Now that the weather is nice, you boys should go outside and play catch.
13. noun A problem, drawback, or hidden detriment, often one that is initially concealed as a means of entrapment. I know this sounds like a great job offer, but there's a pretty big catch—I'd have to move across the country. Why are you selling this for so little? What's the catch?
14. noun An audible break or hesitation in one's voice (typically when one is very emotional). When I heard the catch in her voice, I knew my mom had bad news for me.
15. noun An amount of something that has been caught or captured, such as while fishing. A: "What was your catch today, boys?" B: "Not great, Earl—only five fish."
16. noun The identification or recognition of a problem, error, or inconsistency, often one that is inconspicuous. I never would have noticed that spelling error—good catch!
17. noun An ideal suitor or prospective mate. Tom's a good-looking guy with a six-figure income—he's a real catch!

catch it

To receive a punishment or reprimand. If I get home past curfew again, I'm really going to catch it from my parents!
See also: catch

catch something

Fig. to see or listen to something. I will try to catch that new movie this weekend. Did you catch that radio program about cancer last night?

catch it

to get into trouble and receive punishment. I know I'm going to catch it for denting mom's car when I get home. Bob hit Billy in the face. He really caught it from the teacher for that.
See also: catch

catch it

Also, get it. Receive a punishment or scolding, as in If I forget anything on the shopping list, I'll catch it, or I'm really going to get it when I turn in my paper late. [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: catch

ˈcatch it

(British English) (American English catch ˈhell, ˈget it) (spoken) be punished or spoken to angrily about something: If your dad finds out you’ll really catch it!
See also: catch

catch

1. n. a drawback. Okay, that sounds good, but what’s the catch?
2. tv. to view something; to attend something; to hear something. Did you catch Gone with the Wind on TV?

catch something

tv. to see or listen to something. (More specific than the colloquial sense, to manage to hear something.) Did you catch that radio program about cancer last night?
See also: catch, something

catch it

Informal
To receive a punishment or scolding.
See also: catch
See:
References in periodicals archive ?
What TV executives will say is this: why ask for the moon when television has 74,500 stars desperate to catch themselves on the big screen and reverting to childhood?
Anyone with impaired movement, balance or reflexes might not be able to catch themselves with their arms, elbows or knees, meaning the first thing to hit the ground could be someones head, causing a concussion and potentially a spinal cord injury.
Burning flags, any flags, and posters is wrong plain and simple and people should catch themselves on.
and then catch themselves and instead say, 'tupa' (sheep, but note it is an inversion of p-), or 'pating' (shark) or 'tipaklong' (grasshopper) or whatever.
They will be given the opportunity to catch themselves and be put back into the system.
Further, when someone falls, they involuntarily catch themselves to brace for the impact.
So real, fans might catch themselves ducking flying cocktails and glasses of Sauvignon blanc next time they tune in.
But Doncaster and Blair could do a lot worse than parking this one for just long enough to catch themselves a breath.
Chronic hyponatremia increases osteoclast proliferation and activity, while recent hyponatremia reduces reaction time and makes it less likely people will catch themselves if they stumble.
With David Fincher's adaptation of Gone Girl looming on the horizon, this is undoubtedly a year when audiences will catch themselves returning to filthy habits and furiously biting their nails in the dark of an unbearably tense cinema.
Pai's preliminary research, published in June, found that 24 similar "trips'' in just one walkway session taught older adults to learn to catch themselves and reduced their chances of falling outside the lab, during everyday living, by 50 percent up to a year later.
Chronic hyponatremia increases osteoclast proliferation and activity while recent hyponatremia reduces reaction time and makes it less likely people will catch themselves if they stumble.
We've had cases where amateur players have been injured, particularly when there might be holes in the pitch or in the advertising hoarding where people catch themselves.
Almost immediately they would say but how, and then they would catch themselves and try to figure it out.