catch

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catch

1. verb To see, and perhaps apprehend, someone in the act of doing something (often something nefarious). The robbers were arrested when the police caught them looting another house. I don't watch to catch you kids doing this ever again—the tool shed is far too dangerous to play in!
2. verb, slang To see or hear a specific program or event, typically as broadcast on the TV or radio. Did you catch the game last night? What a crazy ending!
3. verb To hear and/or understand something that has been said. I'm sorry, I didn't catch that last part. Can you repeat it?
4. verb To contract a contagious illness. All of my students are sick right now, so I'm not surprised that I've caught a cold, too. With the way you've been sneezing all day, I really hope I don't catch what you have!
5. verb To encounter or meet with someone, typically for the purpose of communicating with them. This usage often suggests that the person is busy or rushed, and therefore may have limited availability. Hey, I'm glad I caught you—how's your mom doing? Peg has to sign off on your expense report, so be sure to catch her before she leaves the office. I'll catch you later, man.
6. verb To receive a punishment or reprimand. The phrase "catch it" is usually used for this usage. If I get home past curfew again, I'm really going to catch it from my parents!
7. verb To notice a problem, error, or inconsistency, often one that is inconspicuous. Oh, Jen caught that spelling error—I never even noticed it.
8. verb To notice or detect something. Did you catch the joke at the beginning of the movie? It was pretty subtle. I opened the window and caught a whiff of dinner cooking next door.
9. verb In baseball or softball, to play the position of catcher. Joe is sick, so we need someone else to catch tonight.
10. verb To reach a mode of transportation before it departs. Of course we hit a major traffic jam when I have a plane to catch! Oh, she did catch the bus—the driver saw her running and waited for her.
11. verb To stop oneself from doing something. In this usage, "catch" is followed by a reflexive pronoun. Bill tripped over the step but managed to catch himself on the railing before falling. I almost asked about her boyfriend when I caught myself, remembering that they had broken up.
12. noun A game in which two or more people throw a ball back and forth between them. Now that the weather is nice, you boys should go outside and play catch.
13. noun A problem, drawback, or hidden detriment, often one that is initially concealed as a means of entrapment. I know this sounds like a great job offer, but there's a pretty big catch—I'd have to move across the country. Why are you selling this for so little? What's the catch?
14. noun An audible break or hesitation in one's voice (typically when one is very emotional). When I heard the catch in her voice, I knew my mom had bad news for me.
15. noun An amount of something that has been caught or captured, such as while fishing. A: "What was your catch today, boys?" B: "Not great, Earl—only five fish."
16. noun The identification or recognition of a problem, error, or inconsistency, often one that is inconspicuous. I never would have noticed that spelling error—good catch!
17. noun An ideal suitor or prospective mate. Tom's a good-looking guy with a six-figure income—he's a real catch!

catch (one) (doing something)

To find or see one in the act of doing something (often something nefarious). The detective was able to catch the robbers plotting their next scheme. I caught Tom stealing from the cash register.
See also: catch

catch it

To receive a punishment or reprimand. If I get home past curfew again, I'm really going to catch it from my parents!
See also: catch
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

catch something

Fig. to see or listen to something. I will try to catch that new movie this weekend. Did you catch that radio program about cancer last night?

catch it

to get into trouble and receive punishment. I know I'm going to catch it for denting mom's car when I get home. Bob hit Billy in the face. He really caught it from the teacher for that.
See also: catch
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

catch it

Also, get it. Receive a punishment or scolding, as in If I forget anything on the shopping list, I'll catch it, or I'm really going to get it when I turn in my paper late. [Colloquial; early 1800s]
See also: catch
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ˈcatch it

(British English) (American English catch ˈhell, ˈget it) (spoken) be punished or spoken to angrily about something: If your dad finds out you’ll really catch it!
See also: catch
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

catch

1. n. a drawback. Okay, that sounds good, but what’s the catch?
2. tv. to view something; to attend something; to hear something. Did you catch Gone with the Wind on TV?

catch something

tv. to see or listen to something. (More specific than the colloquial sense, to manage to hear something.) Did you catch that radio program about cancer last night?
See also: catch, something
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

catch it

Informal
To receive a punishment or scolding.
See also: catch
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
You can tell him the mackerel are jumping at Granton Harbour so let's get down there and catch ourselves a lesser-spotted dogfish.
It can take a little time and effort to create the habit of a positive attitude and one way is to catch ourselves when we are having a negative attitude thought and form a new positive script in response.
AT times we catch ourselves asking, 'Is this where we imagined ourselves to be?' Are we as lucky, happy, wealthy and healthy as we hoped to be?
In discussions with media colleagues on the likely political end-game, we catch ourselves saying too often that after the skirmishes on the short term, 'kung anong gusto ni Duterte, yun din ang mangyayari.' (What Duterte wants is what will happen.)
Unfortunately, we feel dried up and empty after the season is over; even, during the season itself, we get so busy and so tired celebrating, that we sometimes catch ourselves asking whether the satisfaction we get or give to others at Christmas time is genuine and fully human.
We do catch ourselves sometimes and have to do a quick check, especially when we're around our children or friends who aren't involved in the business.
If only there were a time-travelling machine that would allow us to rewind to just before the exact moment that we catch ourselves saying the words that damage our relationship with that client or prospect.
* The harasser or teaser who helps us catch ourselves when, in an effort to take the care of others and our faith seriously, we inadvertently take a detour and take ourselves too seriously instead;
Unless we catch ourselves, this toxic cycle can suck our lives dry.
If ever we misplace our keys or catch ourselves muttering to nobody in particular, we're a nation that's quick to make jokes about losing our marbles.
But before we expats get excited about Al Nuaimi's charge on behalf employees in the sponsorship system we should catch ourselves; at the same time as advocating the abolition of sponsorship, he wants to see new rules that would also guarantee an employer's rights, says Gulf News.
Kim follows Kyung-chul's actions so closely--as he washes his bloody face in a creek after a wicked slaughter, for instance--that we catch ourselves feeling some shade of identification with, if not sympathy for, the devil.
We look alike, we think alike, in temperament we''re similar and often we catch ourselves repeating each other''s remarks." George Cooper, boxer and corner man; born, May 3, 1934, died, April 11, 2010
"Despite some noble souls donating the money to charity, the rest of us catch ourselves secretly hoping that families opt for cremation."