catbird seat, (sitting) in the

in the catbird seat

In a powerful position. The phrase likely refers to the catbird's preference for high tree branches (a position that helps it to avoid predators). As the CEO's assistant, you are definitely sitting in the catbird seat. I know you were hoping to be elected president over Joe, but, as vice president, you're in the catbird seat if he resigns.
See also: catbird, seat

in the catbird seat

Sl. in a dominant or controlling position. Sally's in the catbird seat—telling everybody where to go. I hold all the aces. I'm in the catbird seat.
See also: catbird, seat

catbird seat

A situation of advantage or superiority, as in His promotion put Charles in the catbird seat. This term is thought to allude to that noisy bird's habitual high perch. It was popularized in the 1940s by sportscaster Red Barber.
See also: catbird, seat

in the catbird seat

in a superior or more advantageous position. North American informal
This expression is said to have originally referred to a baseball player in the fortunate position of having no strikes and therefore three balls still to play (a reference made in James Thurber 's short story The Catbird Seat).
See also: catbird, seat

in the catbird seat

mod. in a dominant or controlling position. I hold all the aces. I’m in the catbird seat.
See also: catbird, seat

catbird seat, (sitting) in the

Being in a position of advantage or superiority. The term originated in the American South, where the catbird is quite common. It is thought to allude to the bird’s habit of singing from a very high perch in trees. It came into common usage in the 1940s when Mississippi-born sportscaster Red Barber would use it, for example, for a pitcher who was almost certain to strike out all the batters. Barber said he himself first heard the term in a poker game where he had bluffed all but one player into dropping out, but the remaining player, who had said from the start that he was sitting in the catbird seat, proved to have an ace and an ace in the hole. James Thurber used the expression as the title of a short story about a mild-mannered accountant who was so irritated by a colleague using this and other terms that he planned to murder her.
See also: catbird

catbird seat

An enviable position, “sitting pretty.” Catbirds seek the highest limbs of trees on which to perch. The view from on high and the relative safety from predators puts them in an advantageous spot. The term is best known as the title of a James Thurber short story and from radio sportscaster Walter Lanier “Red” Barber's using it while broadcasting baseball games.
See also: catbird, seat