cat


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cat

1. n. a fellow; a guy; a dude. Now, this cat wants to borrow some money from me. What should I do?
2. in. to empty one’s stomach; to vomit. Looks like somebody catted in the bushes.
3. n. a gossipy woman. Mary can be such a cat, you know.
See:
References in classic literature ?
'Oh, you sit at home in your dark grey coat and your long tail,' said the Cat, 'and you get fanciful.
The Mouse had a good cleaning out while the Cat was gone, and made the house tidy; but the greedy Cat ate the fat every bit up.
But, like Kipling's cat, he "walked by himself." His paw was against every cat, and every cat's paw against him.
"The airs that cat puts on are perfectly intolerable," declared Stella.
`Then it doesn't matter which way you go,' said the Cat.
`Oh, you're sure to do that,' said the Cat, `if you only walk long enough.'
I cannot be gay, brilliant, debonair in the presence of a cat. Yet always the cat is there.
"That is because I gave you different brains from those we ourselves possess--and much too good for a cat," returned Dr.
She dropped the veil over her face--and, followed by her train of cats, glided out of the room.
He wasn't like most cats who don't care who comes and goes as long as they get plenty to eat.
In the twinkling of an eyelid, the Cat leaped on him, and ate him, feathers and all.
I hope you didn't fall out wi' th' maister for sake o' my cat! he cannot bide answering again--can th' maister.'
He would have preferred to use his noose, but the foliage surrounding the huge cat precluded the possibility of an accurate throw with the rope.
He took a tremendous jump off the top of the wall on to the top of the cat, and cuffed it off the basket, and kicked it into the garden-house, scratching off a handful of fur.
But the dogs and the cats and the children still ran up and followed him through the town --the same as they had done when he was rich.