castle

(redirected from castles)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

a man's home is his castle

One should be the sole person in control of one's home and the happenings there. I vehemently oppose any laws that dictate how I behave in the privacy of my own home. A man's home is his castle! I just couldn't stand the way she kept nagging me over the way I behaved in my own house. A man's home is his castle, damn it!
See also: castle, home

an Englishman's home is his castle

One should be the sole person in control of one's home and the happenings there. Primarily heard in UK. I vehemently oppose any laws that dictate how I behave in the privacy of my own home. An Englishman's home is his castle!
See also: castle, home

build castles in Spain

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in Spain.
See also: build, castle, Spain

build castles in the air

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

build castles in the sky

To create dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the sky.
See also: build, castle, sky

castle in the air

A hope or wish, especially for one's life, that is unlikely to come true. A daydream. I really want to become a famous Hollywood actor, but I realize that it's just a castle in the air and that I shouldn't quit my day job.
See also: air, castle

castles in Spain

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in Spain if you ask me. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—it can't be all castles in Spain.
See also: castle, Spain

castles in the air

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—don't just build castles in the air. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in the air if you ask me.
See also: air, castle

castles in the sky

Dreams, hopes, or plans that are impossible, unrealistic, or have very little chance of succeeding. He keeps talking about how he'll move to Los Angeles to be a famous actor, but it's just castles in the sky if you ask me. You need sound financial advice and a strong plan if you're going to start your own business—it can't be all castles in the sky.
See also: castle, sky

king of the castle

The most powerful, successful, or authoritative person in a group or organization. After years of slowly moving up the ranks, Joe finally became king of the castle in his office. This team will be hard to beat, reigning as king of the castle for three years straight.
See also: castle, king, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

build castles in the air

 and build castles in Spain
Fig. to daydream; to make plans that can never come true. Ann spends most of her time building castles in Spain. I really like to sit on the porch in the evening, just building castles in the air.
See also: air, build, castle

man's home is his castle

Prov. Cliché One can do whatever one wants to in one's own home. Don't tell me not to go around the house in my underwear. A man's home is his castle. I'll play my radio loud if I want to. A man's home is his castle.
See also: castle, home
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

castles in the air

Also, castles in Spain. Dreams about future success, as in Musing about the bestseller list, she was apt to build castles in the air. The first term dates from the late 1500s. The variant, castles in Spain (or chateaux en Espagne), was recorded in the Roman de la Rose in the 13th century and translated into English about 1365.
See also: air, castle
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

castles in the air

If you describe someone's plans as castles in the air, you mean that they are not realistic and have no chance of succeeding. `Along the way, I intend to become very rich.' He shook his head in wonder at her. `You're building castles in the air, Anne.' This could be seen as an admission that Carter's election promises were just castles in the air.
See also: air, castle

an Englishman's home is his castle

BRITISH, OLD-FASHIONED
When people say an Englishman's home is his castle, they mean that British people believe they have the right to do what they want in their own home, and that other people or the state should not interfere in their private lives. He clearly holds a view that an Englishman's home is his castle and he is entitled to take any steps necessary to secure that.
See also: castle, home
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

build castles in the air (or in Spain)

have a visionary and unattainable scheme; daydream.
The concept was known to St Augustine ( 354–430 ), who uses the phrase subtracto fundamento in aere aedificare meaning ‘build on air without foundation’. Castles in the air has been the version predominant in English since the late 16th century, but castles in Spain , from Old French châteaux en Espagne , was used in the late medieval period and occasionally in more recent times. The form of the saying in Old French, known from the 13th century, may refer to the fact that much of Spain in the Middle Ages was under Moorish control, so any scheme to build castles there was clearly unlikely to succeed.
See also: air, build, castle

an Englishman's home is his castle

an English person's home is a place where they may do as they please and from which they may exclude anyone they choose. British proverb
See also: castle, home
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

(build) ˌcastles in the ˈair

(have) plans, hopes, etc. which are unlikely to become reality: They talked about moving to Australia, but they knew they were really only building castles in the air.
See also: air, castle

an ˌEnglishman’s ˌhome is his ˈcastle

(British English) (American English a ˌman’s ˌhome is his ˈcastle) (saying) a person’s home is a place where they can be private and safe and do as they like
See also: castle, home
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
See also:
References in classic literature ?
So, as Norman of Torn rode down from his mighty castle to visit Father Claude, the sunlight playing on his clanking armor and glancing from the copper boss of his shield, the sight of a little group of woodmen kneeling uncovered by the roadside as he passed was not so remarkable after all.
No woman graced the castle of Torn nor had the boy, within his memory, ever known a mother.
Tomorrow he might be assaulting the ramparts of her father's castle, but today he was joyously offering to sacrifice his life for her--had she been the daughter of a charcoal burner he would have done no less--it was enough that she was a woman and in need of protection.
Then he plucked the flower, and set out and travelled day and night, till he came again to the castle.
Come now to my castle with me, and let us live there happily together.'
So they went to the castle where they had both endured so much.
It may be that others have come into the castle. I must to Sir Nigel ere it be too late.
As he spoke, a sudden shouting broke forth in the castle, with the scream of a woman and the rush of many feet.
Three servants of the castle lay dead beside them, all torn and draggled, as though a pack of wolves had been upon them.
I remarked upon the barren result of my efforts with the girl; hadn't got hold of a single point that could help me to find the castle. The youth looked a little surprised, or puzzled, or something, and intimated that he had been wondering to himself what I had wanted to ask the girl all those questions for.
"Why, great guns," I said, "don't I want to find the castle? And how else would I go about it?"
The attendants remained as mute to this address as to the former, and they now stood before the gate of the castle. De Bracy winded his horn three times, and the archers and cross-bow men, who had manned the wall upon seeing their approach, hastened to lower the drawbridge, and admit them.
The domestics, after being carefully searched and disarmed, were confined in another part of the castle; and Rowena was refused even the comfort she might have derived from the attendance of her handmaiden Elgitha.
Now that they were reunited, Dorothy and her friends spent a few happy days at the Yellow Castle, where they found everything they needed to make them comfortable.
"What is this I hear about your castle's becoming a nest and harbor for outlaws?"