cast a long shadow

cast a long shadow

To continue to have consequences well into the future. A: "I know I made a mistake, but that happened years ago! Why are we still talking about it?" B: "Because old sins cast a long shadow."
See also: cast, long, shadow

cast a long shadow

COMMON If something or someone casts a long shadow over something or someone, they have a great, long-lasting influence over them, usually a bad one. It was a time of hardships and the war still cast a long shadow over life in England. Cancer has cast a long shadow over almost every family in the country.
See also: cast, long, shadow
References in periodicals archive ?
But Zane Grey (1872-1939) cast a long shadow, and his son became lost in it as Loren Grey chronicles in this candid interview with the Daily News.
Drug safety has been the big issue of the year, and Graham's actions will cast a long shadow for patients, doctors, and the $450 billion global drug industry.