case the joint

case the joint

1. slang To observe a place in order to familiarize oneself with its workings in preparation for some criminal activity (often robbery). Judging from the security footage, those men cased the joint hours before robbing it.
2. slang By extension, to thoroughly examine a place. In this usage, no devious motive is implied. As soon as my kids walking into the hotel room, they started casing the joint, exclaiming about everything from the TV to the mini-fridge.
See also: case, joint

case the joint

 
1. Sl. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (Underworld.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are. You could see he was casing the joint the way he hung around.
2. Sl. to look a place over. The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes. The old lady entered slowly, casing the joint for someone of her own age, and finally took a seat.
See also: case, joint

case the joint

reconnoitre a place before carrying out a robbery. informal
See also: case, joint

case the ˈjoint

(informal) look carefully around a building so that you can plan how to steal things from it at a later time: I saw two men here earlier. Do you think they were casing the joint?
See also: case, joint

case the joint

1. tv. to look over some place to figure out how to break in, what to steal, etc. (see also joint.) First of all you gotta case the joint to see where things are.
2. tv. to look a place over. (No criminal intent. From sense 1) The dog came in and cased the joint, sniffing out friends and foes.
See also: case, joint
References in periodicals archive ?
Malacanang said that China would have to comply to Philippine laws in case the joint exploration in Service Contract (SC) 57 pushes through as the said area is under the exclusive economic zone (EEZ) of the Philippines.
But Gwilym Owen was recognised because he had been at the Bob Jones Bookmakers premises at Penygroes to case the joint in previous days.
You'll case the joint for surveillance cameras, alarms and escape routes before returning for the loot.
Recorder Richard Atkins told him: "You got yourself smartened up in a suit, and you looked like a young professional when you went to case the joint.
Also re-join line to backing in case the joint is rotten and breaks.
I mean, it's only natural that when you move to one of the dodgiest parts of London you're going to want to invite all your new neighbours round to case the joint, isn't it?