carry (one's) weight

(redirected from carry their weight)

carry (one's) weight

To do one's part. To fulfill one's responsibilities. I know I've been sick, but I'll carry my weight on the project, don't worry.
See also: carry, weight

carry (a lot of) weight (with someone or something)

Fig. to be very influential with someone or some group of people. Your argument does not carry a lot of weight with me. The senator's testimony carried a lot of weight with the council.
See also: carry, weight

carry one's (own) weight

 and pull one's (own) weight
Fig. to do one's share; to earn one's keep. (The weight is the burden that is the responsibility of someone.) Tom, you must be more helpful around the house. We each have to carry our own weight. Bill, I'm afraid that you can't work here anymore. You just haven't been carrying your weight.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight (with someone)

Fig. to have influence with someone; [for an explanation] to amount to a good argument to use with someone. That carries a lot of weight with the older folks. What you say carries no weight with me.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

Also, carry authority or conviction . Exert influence, authority, or persuasion, as in No matter what the President says, his words always carry weight. Shakespeare combined two of these expressions in Henry VIII (3:2): "Words cannot carry authority so weighty." [c. 1600]
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

COMMON If a person or their opinion carries weight, they are respected and are able to influence people. Not only do men talk more, but what they say often carries more weight. El Tiempo is Colombia's leading newspaper and its opinions carry considerable weight in the country.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

be influential or important.
See also: carry, weight

carry ˈweight

be important or able to influence somebody: His opinions carry very little weight with his manager.
See also: carry, weight

carry weight

verb
See also: carry, weight
References in periodicals archive ?
Normal-weight people who carry their weight around their middles are at highest risk of death from any cause compared to people who are overweight or obese, but who carry their weight elsewhere, such as in their hips and legs.
Other research suggested that apple-shaped people, who have a high waist-to-hip ratio, are more likely to have diabetes than are pear-shaped people, who carry their weight in their buttocks and thighs.
Some dancers' bones and muscles are ready to carry their weight en pointe about the time they are ten years old.
The research, published in the July 14, 2010 issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, found that the more an older woman weighs, the worse her memory is likely to be, and that the effect is going to be more pronounced in women who carry their weight around their hips and thighs.
Since men tend to carry their weight around their gut, whereas women settle into their hips, men are "more susceptible to an increase in body fat than women.