carry (something) into effect

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carry (something) into effect

To cause (something) to apply, begin operating, or take effect; to begin implementing or enforcing (something). The new government has vowed to carry several policies into effect, aimed at helping struggling citizens get by. The new law will be carried into effect on the first of January.
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References in periodicals archive ?
164) He did not specify the power by which Congress derived the authority to carry into effect extradition treaties, but given his conclusion that the extradition power derives only from the treaty power, it is hard to think of a source other than the Necessary and Proper Clause.
The treaty power is one of those vested in the government of the United States, so that Congress has power to legislate on the subject of treaties--to carry into effect the provisions that may require legislation.
539, 618-19 (1842) (observing that "[Congress] has, on various occasions, exercised powers which were necessary and proper as means to carry into effect rights expressly given and duties expressly enjoined thereby," and shortly afterwards observing that Congress has the power to implement treaties even though this "power is nowhere in positive terms conferred upon Congress").
507 (1795), Supreme Court Justice Iredell declared that 'a Court of Admiralty in one nation, can carry into effect the determination of the Court of Admiralty of another.
the board shall adopt and revise such rules and regulations as may be necessary to enable it to carry into effect the provisions of the Nurse Practice Act and to maintain high standards of practice; B.
Incidental powers arise from the general rule of agency that every delegation of authority carries with it the power to do acts that are necessary to carry into effect the express powers conferred.
invests the President as Commander in Chief with the power to wage war which Congress has declared, and to carry into effect all laws passed by Congress for the conduct of war and for the government and regulation of the Armed Forces, and all laws defining and punishing offences against the law of nations, including those which pertain to the conduct of war," wrote Chief Justice Harlan Stone in the unanimous opinion of the Court.