carry forward


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Related to carry forward: Carry Forward Losses

carry forward

1. To cause a plan or situation to progress. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "forward." With your shared passion for this initiative, I'm confident that you two can carry it forward.
2. In accounting, to transfer an entry to the next page or column. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "forward." Did you carry forward the total from the last page? If not, that might be the source of the error.
See also: carry, forward

carry over

1. verb To physically carry someone or something to a particular place or area. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "over." You carry the baby over to the car, and I'll get her stroller and diaper bag. We need some more chairs in here—can you guys carry those ones over to the table?
2. In accounting, to transfer an entry to another page or column. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "over." Did you carry over the total from the last page? If not, that might be the source of the error.
3. To continue to be applicable or to affect future situations, sometimes unpleasantly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "over." She needs to address her grief now so that it doesn't carry over into all areas of her life. I don't want to work in an office forever, but the skills I learn here will carry over to any future job, at least.
4. To postpone something until a later time. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "over." Because the meeting ran so long, we're carrying over the last issue on the agenda.
5. To keep unsold goods at the end of one season for use in the future. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "over." I know you want to carry over all of these summer clothes, but how will we market a sundress in the middle of winter?
See also: carry

carry something forward

to take a figure from one column or category to another. Now, carry this figure forward into the tens column.
See also: carry, forward

carry something over (until some time)

 and carry something over (to some time)
to defer something until a particular time. Can we carry this discussion over until later? We will carry over our discussion to tomorrow.
See also: carry

carry something over

to let something like a bill extend into another period of time. We'll carry the amount of money due over into the next month. Yes, please carry over the balance.
See also: carry

carry over

 (to something)
1. [for a sum or other figure] to be taken to another column of figures. This amount carries over into the next column. Yes, this number carries over.
2. to last or continue until another time. Will this enthusiasm carry over to the following week? Of course, it will carry over.
See also: carry

carry over

to extend into another time period or location. I don't like for bills to carry over into the next month. Please do not let the paragraph carry over.
See also: carry

forward something (from some place) (to someone or some place)

to send something onward to someone from the place it was originally received. We forwarded the letter from Chicago to Springfield. Kelly forwarded the letter to her brother.

carry forward

1. Also, carry over. Transfer a bookkeeping entry to the next column, page, another account, or the next accounting period, as in Let's carry forward this loss to the next quarter for a saving in taxes, or She made an error in carrying over this column. The first term dates from the first half of the 1800s; the variant dates from the mid-1700s.
2. Make progress in, advance, as in His successor hoped to carry forward his work. Also see carry on.
See also: carry, forward

carry over

1. See carry forward, def. 1.
2. To keep something, usually merchandise, for a subsequent period. For example, We'll carry over this summer's bathing suits for next winter's resort season.
3. Persist from one time or situation to another, as in His leadership in sports carried over to the classroom. [Late 1800s]
See also: carry

carry forward

v.
1. In accounting, to transfer some entry to the next column, page, or book, or to another account: The company decided to carry their losses forward to offset future profits.
2. To succeed or make progress with something: I thought of the plan, and my assistant carried it forward.
See also: carry, forward

carry over

v.
1. To transport something or someone from one place to another: After I finished eating, I carried my plate over to the sink.
2. To transfer some account from one column or category to another one relating to the same account: The company carried its losses over to the next year for tax purposes. The accountant carried over the balance to the next statement.
3. To retain merchandise or other goods for a subsequent (usually the next) season: The store disappointed many of its fashionable customers when it carried over its fall collection. Because of the weak market, farmers carried a billion bushels of corn over from last year.
4. To persist to another time or situation: The confidence gained in remedial classes carried over into the children's regular schoolwork.
5. To defer something to another time: We will carry over all unfinished business to the next meeting. Can we carry this conversation over to another time?
See also: carry
References in periodicals archive ?
S would carry forward the unused deductible expenses of $4,500 to 1996.
In addition, S would carry forward to 1996 the $1,500 of NDNC expenses not used to reduce basis in 1995.
Tom will continue to carry forward $21,000 of the capital loss.
The real excitement is not just in the expansion we are experiencing right now, but the expansion that is expected to carry forward into 2006 and beyond," said Mr.
Currently the Company has a treasury of $5 million, to carry forward its operations.
Austin, Texas, USA, said the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has concluded its examination of the company's tax returns, its net operating losses, and minimum tax credit carry forwards through 1996.
The Company intends to explore ways to preserve these net operating loss carry forwards, which we view as valuable tax assets.
Examples of such uncertainties and contingencies include, among other important factors, those affecting the insurance industry in general, such as the economic and interest rate environment, legislative and regulatory developments and market pricing and competitive trends, and those relating specifically to the Company and its businesses, such as the level of its insurance premiums and fee income, and acquisitions of companies or blocks of business, its ability to sustain growth and to successfully transition to the Pink Sheets, whether there will be an active trading market in the Company's stock on the Pink Sheets, the Company's ability to preserve its net operating loss carry forwards and the accompanying tax benefits.
15 (closing price on May 30, 2006), the pre-tax proceeds of the sale would amount to $700 million and all capital gains on the sale would be fully covered by the deductible portion of the settlement payment and Vivendi's US tax loss carry forwards.
GY's ratings benefit from the company's sizable landholdings in the Sacramento, CA area; tax loss carry forwards that may allow the company to offset pretax profits in excess of $350 million at the federal level and $275 million at the state level; the global settlement with the government that provides for up to 88% reimbursement for most of GY's environmental remediation costs; the renegotiating of the Atlas contract, which will allow GY to cease production by the end of fiscal 2007 if it does not receive better terms; the completion of its transformation into a company focused on real estate and aerospace and defense (Aerojet); fully funded pension plans; a positive defense spending environment; and the resolution of a number of outstanding lawsuits.
Because of the land's low book value, Fitch expects any such transaction would utilize the loss carry forwards.