carry off

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carry off

1. To complete or do something successfully, especially when faced with obstacles. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I never expected to carry off the party once the caterer suddenly quit, but everyone seems to have had a great time!
2. To steal something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I think someone carried off our new porch furniture—it's nowhere in sight! Ethel forgot to put that expensive necklace in the safe, and one of the party guests carried it off.
3. To physically move someone or something away from a certain location. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Luckily, the lifeguard was able to rescue Dan after the current carried him off.
4. To win a prize or contest. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Everyone was shocked when that little-known band carried off the night's biggest award.
5. To cause one's death. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Unfortunately, the injuries from the accident were so severe that they carried him off.
See also: carry, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

carry someone or something off

to take or steal someone or something. The kidnappers carried the child off. They carried off the child.
See also: carry, off

carry something off

 
1. Lit. to take something away with oneself; to steal something. Someone carried off my books! I think someone carried off the lawn chairs last night.
2. Fig. to make a planned event work out successfully. It was a huge party, but the hostess carried it off beautifully. The magician carried off the trick with great skill.
See also: carry, off
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

carry off

1. Handle successfully, win, as in It was a difficult situation, but he managed to carry it off gracefully, or They carried off first prize. [First half of 1800s]
2. Cause the death of someone, as in The new African virus carried off an entire village. This usage is less common today. [Late 1600s]
See also: carry, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

carry off

v.
1. To pick up something or someone and move away: The wind carried off the balloon. The criminal frowned as the police carried him off.
2. To steal something or someone: The bandits broke into the farmyard and carried off the chickens. The painting was the city's most treasured possession until thieves carried it off.
3. To handle or accomplish something successfully: The performance was unrehearsed, but we carried it off without a problem. The host carried off the event beautifully.
4. To win something, as an award or prize: The film carried off four of the top prizes. The prize was $10,000, and I was determined to carry it off.
5. To cause the death of someone: Heart disease finally carried him off. Many pioneers were carried off by fever.
See also: carry, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Savard was on the ice for several minutes, being attended to by a Penguins team doctor, before being carried off. He was moving his legs while on the ice and his arms while on the stretcher.
An excellent performance of Carmen, carried off by a mere 15 singers
Arteta was carried off after twisting his knee just three minutes into the game at St James' Park, and Moyes admitted the initial reports were far from promising.
Corbett and Broughton went close towards the end as Cheltenham were reduced to 10 men after midfielder John Finnigan was the second Robins player to be carried off after all the subs had been used.
They'll go in the solution or they travel in the groundwater and they get carried off into the lakes.
Stubbs admits being carried off against Gers' three weeks agofelt nothing like the emotional pain suffered after being dumped by Falkirk in last season's Ibrox Scottish Cup semi-final.
She was carried off by Cadmus, and all the gods honored the wedding with their presence.
He was carried off (left) after damaging knee ligaments in the win over Roma.
Dyer was carried off on a stretcher from Carrow Road just before half-time, with a "a suspected fractured ankle", after he fell awkwardly in a challenge with Norwich defender Sebastien Bassong, having earlier put the visitors in front on 12 minutes.
FALKIRK'S never-say-die spirit was summed up when teenage star Stephen Kingsley had to be carried off the team bus as he was too shattered to walk.
The Northampton lock was treated on the field by a team of medics for ten minutes before being carried off on a stretcher with a neck brace.
Other winners included ITV1's Benidorm which carried off the award for Most Popular Comedy Programme and Waterloo Road which won Most Popular Drama.
They carried off the Great Wall Cup - sponsored by the Brighouse restaurant - against bowlers from as far as Bridlington, Rotherham and Castleford.
Green was carried off with a suspected torn groin muscle - which gifted Belarus their equaliser - five minutes after coming on as a substitute during England's 2-1 defeat to Belarus at Reading.
England have a major injury scare on their hands after Richard Hill was carried off during Saracens' 20-3 defeat at London Irish.