carry off

(redirected from carried her off)

carry off

1. To complete or do something successfully, especially when faced with obstacles. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I never expected to carry off the party once the caterer suddenly quit, but everyone seems to have had a great time!
2. To steal something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." I think someone carried off our new porch furniture—it's nowhere in sight! Ethel forgot to put that expensive necklace in the safe, and one of the party guests carried it off.
3. To physically move someone or something away from a certain location. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Luckily, the lifeguard was able to rescue Dan after the current carried him off.
4. To win a prize or contest. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Everyone was shocked when that little-known band carried off the night's biggest award.
5. To cause one's death. A noun or pronoun can be used between "carry" and "off." Unfortunately, the injuries from the accident were so severe that they carried him off.
See also: carry, off

carry someone or something off

to take or steal someone or something. The kidnappers carried the child off. They carried off the child.
See also: carry, off

carry something off

 
1. Lit. to take something away with oneself; to steal something. Someone carried off my books! I think someone carried off the lawn chairs last night.
2. Fig. to make a planned event work out successfully. It was a huge party, but the hostess carried it off beautifully. The magician carried off the trick with great skill.
See also: carry, off

carry off

1. Handle successfully, win, as in It was a difficult situation, but he managed to carry it off gracefully, or They carried off first prize. [First half of 1800s]
2. Cause the death of someone, as in The new African virus carried off an entire village. This usage is less common today. [Late 1600s]
See also: carry, off

carry off

v.
1. To pick up something or someone and move away: The wind carried off the balloon. The criminal frowned as the police carried him off.
2. To steal something or someone: The bandits broke into the farmyard and carried off the chickens. The painting was the city's most treasured possession until thieves carried it off.
3. To handle or accomplish something successfully: The performance was unrehearsed, but we carried it off without a problem. The host carried off the event beautifully.
4. To win something, as an award or prize: The film carried off four of the top prizes. The prize was $10,000, and I was determined to carry it off.
5. To cause the death of someone: Heart disease finally carried him off. Many pioneers were carried off by fever.
See also: carry, off
References in classic literature ?
His parents had naturally desired to see her once at least before he carried her off to a distant settlement, English or colonial; and as no opinion of theirs was to be allowed to change his intention, he judged that a couple of months' life with him in lodgings whilst seeking for an advantageous opening would be of some social assistance to her at what she might feel to be a trying ordeal--her presentation to his mother at the Vicarage.
Her disorder turned to a galloping Consumption and in a few days carried her off.
The crowd showed its appreciation by giving the young lady a huge round of applause as a grinning security official, after getting his hands on the streaker, flipped her over his back and carried her off the field, the report added.
Detectives are seeking seven men who bound and gagged her and carried her off in her own car.
After determining that Cox had feeling in her fingers and toes, paramedics strapped her on a backboard, fitted her with a neck brace and carried her off the field on a stretcher.
Harry's squad starred 11-year-old cutey Mafusi Maqhoane, who wore a pink flower patterned dress and declared the skipper 'beautiful' and 'fun' after he picked her up around the waist and carried her off away from the ball.
But these reservations were more than offset by the serene legato of Whelan and Woetzel sharing the pas de deux of In G Major; by the consistent focus of the group promenade in Glass Pieces; and by that exquisite moment of In the Night when Peter Boal held Pascale van Kipnis, upside-down and delicately fluttering her feet, then shifted her so that one knee pressed against his chest as he carried her off.
Then he carried her off through crowds of shoppers.
Apollo, who was watching, fell in love with her and carried her off from Mount Pelion, in Thessaly, to Libya.