care for (someone or something)

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care for (someone or something)

1. To act as a caretaker for someone or something. We need to hire a nurse to care for grandpa when he gets out of the hospital. Judging by the overgrown weeds and broken shutters, no one has been caring for this house.
2. To have a strong feeling of love or affection for someone or something; to cherish someone or something. There is nothing I care for more than my children.
3. To like someone or something. Often used in the negative to mean the opposite. I know you don't care for asparagus, so I made string beans instead.
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care for someone or something

to take care of someone or something. Will you care for my cat while I am away? I would be happy to care for your child.
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care for someone

to feel tenderly toward someone; to love someone. I care for you a great deal, Walter. I care for you too, Alice.
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care for something

to like the taste of some kind of food or drink. (Usually used with a negative.) I don't care for sweet potatoes. I don't care for sweet desserts.
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care for

v.
1. To like or love someone or something: I care for you very deeply.
2. To provide needed assistance or supervision to someone or something: The hospital hired more nurses to care for the sick. My sister cares for my dog when I'm out of town.
3. To like or have an attachment to someone or something. Usually used in the negative: I don't really care for strawberry ice cream.
See also: care
References in periodicals archive ?
Walsh wrote of the plight of the needy aged: "With regard to this problem--the care of the aged poor--I may say at once that our present mode of caring for them [in 1916] is almost barbarous....
And so we have hospitals filled to capacity in every city, caring for patients in a slow and inefficient fashion.
Today's nursing homes are faced with the challenge of caring for increasingly sicker patients within the confines of the limitations imposed by Medicare.
Managing the health of an enrolled population within a budget is quite different than managing an organization or caring for a patient in the open-ended, cost-plus, fee-for-service environment that prevailed following World War II.
This facility repositioned itself as caring for only patients requiring ventilators, feeding tubes or other high-tech assistance.
As stated previously, we are excellent at caring for the individual patient, but poor at treating the population.
For physicians who work in HMOs concerned with quality, the distinction between caring for individuals--patients one at a time--and populations of patients is central to success.