card


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to card: birthday card, card games

*card

Fig. an entertaining and clever person who says or does funny things. (*Typically: act like ~; be ~.) He is such a card. Always making jokes. Mary is a card, and she has to learn to take things seriously sometimes.

card

verb
See phish

card

1. n. a funny person. Britney is such a card. She cracks me up.
2. tv. to check people’s ID cards for age or other eligibility. (see also carded.) They card everybody at the football games, even the parents.
3. Go to phish.
See:
References in classic literature ?
"So you are not afraid to play with me?" repeated Dolokhov, and as if about to tell a good story he put down the cards, leaned back in his chair, and began deliberately with a smile:
"Oh, those Moscow gossips!" said Dolokhov, and he took up the cards with a smile.
"Why, this is Count de Coude, of France." "If I am mistaken," said the accuser, "I shall gladly apologize; but before I do so first let monsieur le count explain the extra cards which I saw him drop into his side pocket."
"There are no cards in my coat," and with that he ran his hand into his pocket.
"Gentlemen," he continued, "monsieur le count did not know that those cards were in his pocket.
Kearns, with every eye upon him, looked at his two-card draw, counted the other three to dispel any doubt of holding more than five cards, and wrote on a betting slip.
He likewise examined his draw and counted his five cards.
Simultaneously and in silence they faced their cards on the table, while a general tiptoeing and craning of necks took place among the onlookers.
The means of happiness are on the cards and the dice.
'If you're not coming yourself, give us the cards, will you?'
"Nothing can make matters worse than they are," she thought, despairingly, as Arnold dealt the cards for her.
Arnold looked at his hand--and "proposed." Anne declined to change the cards. Arnold announced, with undiminished good-humor, that he saw his way clearly, now, to losing the game, and then played his first card--the Queen of Trumps!
No one made any objection but Marianne, who with her usual inattention to the forms of general civility, exclaimed, "Your Ladyship will have the goodness to excuse ME--you know I detest cards. I shall go to the piano-forte; I have not touched it since it was tuned." And without farther ceremony, she turned away and walked to the instrument.
When he had finished, Trent took up the cards, which he had shuffled for Poker, and dealt them out for Patience.
Then he shrugged his shoulders and gathered up the cards.