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carbon copy

1. A copy of a document that is made by placing a sheet of carbon paper under the original so that the print gets transferred from the original to the sheet of paper below it. Carbon copies are largely obsolete but are still used in some cases for receipts. Could you please make a carbon copy of that invoice? I need it for my records.
2. To include additional recipients on an email message that is intended for, or directed to, another person. Often abbreviated as "cc." Please carbon copy me on that email to Janice. I want her to know I am aware of the situation.
3. A person or thing that closely resembles someone or something else in looks or attributes. Even though they were born several years apart, Darren is a carbon copy of his brother. They have the same gait, mannerisms, and hairstyle.
See also: carbon, copy

carbon copy

A person or thing that closely resembles another, as in Our grandson is a carbon copy of his dad. Originally this term meant a copy of a document made by using carbon paper. The linguistic transfer to other kinds of duplicate survived the demise of carbon paper (replaced by photocopiers, computer printers, and other more sophisticated devices). [c. 1870]
See also: carbon, copy

a carbon copy

COMMON If one person or thing is a carbon copy of another, the two people or things are identical, or very similar. Hugh was a carbon copy of his father, Edward; both had the same blond hair and easy charm. The town, almost a carbon copy of Gualdo, is best known for its mineral waters. Note: A carbon copy of a document is an exact copy of it which is made using carbon paper.
See also: carbon, copy

carbon copy

a person or thing identical or very similar to another.
The expression comes from the idea of an exact copy of written or typed material made by using carbon paper.
See also: carbon, copy

a ˌcarbon ˈcopy

a person or thing that is exactly or extremely like another: The recent robberies in Leeds are a carbon copy of those that have occurred in Halifax over the last few months.
A carbon copy is a copy of a document, letter, etc. made by placing carbon paper (= thin paper with a dark substance on one side) between two sheets of paper.
See also: carbon, copy
References in periodicals archive ?
Frisen and his colleagues found that samples from people born before 1955 did indeed have carbon 14 in heart muscle cell DNA, indicating that the cells had been created after the person's birth.
Carbon 14 is formed through the action of energetic cosmic rays on nitrogen 14 in the outer atmosphere of the Earth.
The basic uniformitarian assumption underlying carbon 14 dating is that the ratio of carbon 12 to carbon 14 in the atmosphere at the time the plant died is the same as at the time that the plant is dated.
Now, Edouard Bard of the Center for Weak Radioactivity in Gif-sur-Yvette, France and his colleagues report they have used coral to calibrate the carbon 14 scale over the past 30,000 years, an advance one scientist describes as a "quantum leap.
While carbon 14 specialists expected the scale needed correction, "They are all surprised it's that large," says Fairbanks.
An independent Carbon 14 study of our process is now available on request and I am pleased to announce that Churchill is the only company to have biodegradable product listed in the GSA catalogue.
Using LLNL's Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Buchholz measured the amount of carbon 14 in DNA in beta cells and discovered that after age 30, the body does not create any new beta cells, thus decreasing the capacity to produce insulin as a person ages.
Because DNA is stable after a cell has gone through its last cell division, the concentration of carbon 14 in DNA serves as a date mark for when a cell was born and can be used to date cells in humans.
Radioactive materials covered by this class include Iodine 131 in both Sodium Iodide and Monoiodobenzene forms, Cobalt 60, Carbon 14 and others.
It relies upon the fact that all living organisms absorb low levels of a radioactive isotope known as carbon 14, a heavy form of carbon which is present in low levels in the atmosphere.
After death, levels of this isotope in animal and plant remains will slowly decay away, meaning scientists can estimate their age from the amount of carbon 14 that remains in the sample.
Scientists from the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Karolinska Institute, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon, Lund University, and Lund University Hospital made these findings by using the amount of carbon 14 in the atmosphere from above-ground nuclear testing in the 1950s and 1960.
Based on the carbon 14, the living polyps are only a few years old, or at least their carbon is, but they have been continuously replaced for centuries to millennia while accreting their underlying skeleton," he added.