carbo load

(redirected from carbohydrate loads)

carbo load

To eat large quantities of carbohydrates, as one would typically do in preparation for running a marathon. "Carbo" is short for "carbohydrate." You better start carbo loading now if you want to make it through the race on Saturday.
See also: carbo, load
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

carbo load

Consume a large amount of carbohydrate food, as in Karen began carbo loading three days before the road race. This term, a clipping of "carbohydrate loading," originated among marathon runners, who were advised to build up their strength before a race by eating quantities of foods like spaghetti. [1970s]
See also: carbo, load
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Exponential increase in postprandial blood glucose exposure with increasing carbohydrate loads using a linear carbohydrate to insulin ratio.
There was a significant increase (p < 0.0002) in the peak glucose and time to return to baseline (p < 0.002) as carbohydrate loads increased, without a significant increase in time to peak levels.
There was an increase in time to maximum glucose from baseline, a greater peak and delayed return to baseline with these larger carbohydrate loads.
Our analysis convincingly demonstrates that the AUC increases exponentially, and not linearly, with increasing carbohydrate load over the range of carbohydrate loads tested.
Our study's strength lies in showing the importance of insulin dose regulation by diabetics according to the carbohydrate loads consumed.
Previous euglycaemic clamp studies found a linear relationship between the insulin infused and carbohydrate load. [10] However, significant differences exist between the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties of subcutaneously injected bolus insulin and continuous intravenous insulin infusions.
Full browser ?