car


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panda car

A police car. Primarily heard in UK. Slow down, there's a panda car up ahead!
See also: car

live out of (one's) car

To sleep and store all or most of one's possessions in one's car, usually because one is without a proper residence. I've been living out of my car ever since I was evicted from my apartment. It is shameful that the housing crisis has forced so many families to live out of their cars.
See also: car, live, of, out

new car smell

The scent associated with the inside of a brand new vehicle, caused by the plastics and other materials inside it. Boy, I love that new car smell, don't you?
See also: car, new, smell

puffer car

slang A car left running unattended to warm the engine and cabin on a cold day, so called for the exhaust emitting from the tailpipe. Police are warning that thefts of puffer cars has been rising as the weather continues turning colder. I always see puffer cars in people's driveways first thing in the morning during winter.
See also: car, puffer

steer away from (someone or something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in a direction away from someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "away" to specify what is being driven. I steered away from the truck that was stopped in the middle of the road. She managed to steer the car away from the crowd of people at the last moment.
2. To avoid interacting with someone. Steer away from the boss today—he's yelling at everyone he sees. I always try to steer away from toxic or negative people in my life.
3. To avoid pursuing, utilizing, or committing to something. I suggest you steer away from the trains today—there's a strike on, so none of them are on time. I think we would do well to steer away from such drastic measures.
4. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to avoid someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "away." I try to steer people away from that brand, to be honest. They may be less expensive, but those computers are notorious for breaking down. She keeps trying to steer me away from her brother, but he and I are just naturally drawn to each other.
See also: away, steer

steer into (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle into something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "into" to specify what is being driven. I swerved to avoid the truck that was barreling toward us and steered right into the side of a building. She steered her boat into the harbor. The maniac steered his van right into a crowd of people.
2. To guide, direct, or lead someone into some situation. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "into." The star quarterback helped steer the team into the playoffs for the first time in nearly 40 years. That dodgy financial advisor steered us into all sorts of bad investments.
See also: steer

steer through (something)

1. To manage to drive (a vehicle) through some difficult, dangerous, or adverse impediment or weather condition. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I didn't feel confident enough to steer the car through all the snow and ice on the ground, so I let Mary drive instead. It was difficult steering through such turbulent weather, but I knew we had to get back to shore as soon as we could. How could you even steer through such thick fog?
2. To navigate or maneuver (a vehicle) through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "through" to specify what is being driven. I don't know how we'll be able to steer through this crowd of people. We had to steer the boat through the series of buoys the police has set in the harbor. My mother always finds it so stressful having to steer her car through these narrows streets of this town whenever she comes to visit me.
3. To guide or direct someone through some passage or obstacle. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." I'd feel better if Mark were there to help steer you through those treacherous mountain roads. The captain of the ship steered us through the narrow river so we could see some more of the indigenous jungle wildlife.
4. To guide or direct someone through some difficult, confusing, or convoluted situation or process. A noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "through." We hired a lawyer to steer us through the application for our permits. Our advisors will help steer you through the various options at your disposal for your retirement fund.
See also: steer, through

steer toward (something)

1. To guide or aim a vehicle in the direction of someone or something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "steer" and "toward" to specify what is being driven. Keep the boat steady and toward the lighthouse. The police officer told me to steer the car toward a checkpoint on the side of the road. The pilot began steering the plane toward the nearest airport.
2. To attempt to convince or persuade someone to choose, consider, or become involved with someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "steer" and "toward." Mary said she wanted to go out with Mark, but I tried to steer her toward Mike instead. These pushy salespeople always try to steer you toward the more expensive options. I always try to steer my clients toward sensible investments that will yield steady, long-term growth.
See also: steer, toward

wrap one's car around something

to drive one's car into something at fairly high speed. She wrapped her car around a light pole. If he hadn't wrapped his car around a tree, he'd be here with us tonight.
See also: around, car, wrap

wrap one’s car around something

tv. to drive one’s car into something at fairly high speed. She wrapped her car around a light pole.
See also: around, car, something, wrap
References in periodicals archive ?
Catchpole had never come across the idea of feng shui for cars, but he believed that the environment provided by a car, similar to buildings, can directly affect a driver's inner energies and attitudes, which, in turn, can affect driver safety.
Volkswagen launched the flex car in March 2003 to initial consumer mistrust.
Compare the shape of NASCAR's stock cars to the car models used in the Indy Racing League and Formula One.
The Washingtons still owed 57,000 on it and a trade-in would have left them with $5,500 on top of the new car note.
USS is short for the techie-sounding "Used car System Solutions," but the acronym originally stood for something considerably less high falutin'.
Buhrer, who joined the Buckeye chapter hi 1987 and now publishes the Lambda Car Club International newsletter, says the group provides a forum to fuel his fondness for four-wheelers.
According to the guide, a car is in (1) excellent condition if it has no defects; (2) average condition if it has some defects, but is safe to drive; and (3) poor condition if it needs substantial mechanical or body repairs or is unsafe to drive.
Just because Uncle Sam gives you a $1,000 tax deduction for donating your car doesn't mean that Easter Seals will receive a check in the same amount.
Looking like something George Jetson would fly to his home in the Skypad Apartments, the Moller Sky Car prototype has four sizeable engine nacelles, a large rear wing, and a clear bubble-top canopy.
Only a noisy air compressor gave evidence that this car was a work in progress.
Fortunately, the couple got out alive--no thanks to the car dealer.
The second set of attitudes now constitutes the politically correct view of cars and car culture, and if the car haters have their way, it won't be long until the "car lobby" evokes the same odious connotation as the "tobacco lobby.