campaign

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rumor campaign

A concentrated and prolonged effort to damage or ruin someone's or some group's reputation through the perpetuation of rumors, innuendos, and/or falsities, generally as a means of persuading a large number of people against him, her, or them. Primarily heard in US. The local sheriff's slim lead heading into the election quickly evaporated after he found himself at the wrong end of a vicious rumor campaign. I think we need to start a rumor campaign to slow down the competitor's growth in the market, but no one can know that it's coming from us!
See also: campaign, rumor

rumour campaign

A concentrated and prolonged effort to damage or ruin someone's or some group's reputation through the perpetuation of rumours, innuendos, and/or falsities, generally as a means of persuading a large amount of people against him, her, or them. Primarily heard in UK. Finding himself at the wrong end of a vicious rumour campaign, the local MP's slim lead heading into the election quickly evaporated. I think we need to start a rumour campaign to slow down the competitor's growth in the market, but no one can know that it's coming from us!
See also: campaign, rumour

whispering campaign

The spread of rumors, with the intent of damaging a person's reputation The whispering campaign that the opposition has launched against me is just awful! I haven't done any of the things they've claimed! I'm always skeptical of the terrible allegations that come out in these whispering campaigns.
See also: campaign, whisper

campaign against (someone or something)

1. To strongly oppose someone or something and encourage others to do the same; to fight against someone or something. Many people in our small town are campaigning against that big construction project because they feel that we don't need more stores so close to our homes.
2. To pursue an elected office against a specific opponent. I'll never win the student council presidency if I have to campaign against Caroline—she's so popular!
See also: campaign

campaign for (someone or something)

1. To strongly support someone or something and encourage others to do the same; to fight in favor of someone or something. Many people in our small town are campaigning for that big construction project because the closest store right now is 10 miles away.
2. To support a candidate pursuing an elected office and encourage others to do the same. I'm campaigning for Caroline in the race for student council president—here, have a button!
See also: campaign

campaign against someone or something

 
1. to crusade or battle against someone or something. Currently, I am campaigning against littering. Sarah is campaigning against crooked politicians.
2. to run one's political campaign against someone or something. I campaigned against the incumbent and won. John spent a lot of time campaigning against Sarah for class president.
See also: campaign

campaign for someone or something

to support actively someone or someone's candidacy for political office. I would be very happy to campaign for you. I want to campaign for the winning candidate.
See also: campaign

smear campaign (against someone)

a campaign aimed at damaging someone's reputation by making accusations and spreading rumors. The politician's opponents are engaging in a smear campaign against him. Jack started a smear campaign against Tom so that Tom wouldn't get the manager's job.
See also: campaign, smear

smear campaign

An attempt to ruin a reputation by slander or vilification, as in This press agent is well known for starting smear campaigns against her clients' major competitors . This phrase was first recorded in 1938 and uses smear in the sense of "an attempt to discredit" or "slander."
See also: campaign, smear

whispering campaign

A deliberate spreading of derogatory rumors about a candidate, as in That whispering campaign destroyed his chances for election. [c. 1920]
See also: campaign, whisper
References in periodicals archive ?
There's a reason why campaigns invest a fortune in robo-calls, mind- numbing commercials and simplistic slate mailers -- they work.
Steele is hardly alone in his professed outrage at aggressive campaign tactics.
The Portland League of Women Voters played an active role in this campaign.
Another awkward fact was that Cogswell had vocally supported Ralph Nader in the 2000 presidential campaign, and had been as disdainful of mainstream Democrats as Nader himself was.
Throughout the following months, Adculture continued CSCO's publicity campaign.
As the overriding objective in the campaign was to get parents to play an active role in keeping children on wheels safe, the campaign's success was measured not only by the quality and quantity of media coverage, but also by the level of success in changing parents'/caregivers' behaviours.
Nearly 90% of Americans now recognize Aflac's name, the company said, largely because of the duck campaign, which takes a humorous approach to insurance while sending the serious message for its need.
But the scandal that forced Nixon to resign in 1974 was also a campaign finance scandal, involving illegal contributions by the milk industry and others.
The pursuit of gay and lesbian votes and money is a far cry from campaigns of even a decade ago, when homosexuality was kept pretty much in the closet.
Under the Internal Revenue Service Code, nonprofit groups, including houses of worship, may not intervene in partisan campaigns directly or indirectly, nor may they distribute biased campaign literature.
Although each electoral cycle seems to reach new and previously unimagined highs, the scandal- ridden 1996 campaigns were the most expensive in U.
With new technologies and a targeted audience, the mobile platform represents an effective medium to launch innovative campaigns for our brands," said Tom Talbert, senior vice president, director media services at Campbell-Ewald.
George Runner's campaign committee was fined $5,500 and ordered to return $6,400 to a Lancaster medical firm and a car dealer for accepting two campaign contributions beyond the monetary limit and for other violations of state election law.
Party committees, presidential candidates and senatorial candidates in competitive races, however, succeeded in their fundraising efforts, setting new records in the amount of "hard," or restricted, money contributed to campaigns by individuals.