campaign for

campaign for (someone or something)

1. To strongly support someone or something and encourage others to do the same; to fight in favor of someone or something. Many people in our small town are campaigning for that big construction project because the closest store right now is 10 miles away.
2. To support a candidate pursuing an elected office and encourage others to do the same. I'm campaigning for Caroline in the race for student council president—here, have a button!
See also: campaign

campaign for someone or something

to support actively someone or someone's candidacy for political office. I would be very happy to campaign for you. I want to campaign for the winning candidate.
See also: campaign
References in periodicals archive ?
And despite the long hours many campaign workers put in, some question whether it makes sense for candidates to set up and pay for benefits for workers who might only be on a campaign for a few months or weeks.
For example, the "Campaign for Real Beauty," promoting Dove-branded products, used "real women" to start and sustain a conversation about the definition of beauty around the world.
"We ended up with a program that undermines Medicare and costs way too much for a program with major gaps in coverage," said Roger Hickey, co-director of the Campaign for America's Future and a founder of Americans United, a coalition of consumer and labor groups demanding that Congress fix the plan.
The current image of Boise State was being driven by memories of Boise Junior College, the limited advertising that was being done by the College of Applied Technology, and the success of the football team." A variety of events and programs were being individually promoted, yet a proactive brand campaign for the university didn't exist.
* The Enron Tapes: A Campaign for Consumers Corporate Communications Team Snohomish PUD Everett, Washington, USA
The trade campaign for the West Nile-Innovator vaccine consisted of advertisements in veterinary journals, while the consumer campaign employed a more complex strategy to reach the caregivers of the 6.9 million U.S.
"Campaign money--not votes--is now the currency of our democracy, determining who is able to run a viable campaign for office, who usually wins, and who has the ear of elected officials," said Nick Nyhart, executive director of Public Campaign.
The solidarity expressed in the FSAM was with a struggle far away (far away at least in practical terms, even if it was also conceived by many as fundamentally a global struggle), but it was a solidarity that was organized and expressed locally in corporate boycotts, in consulate pickets, and in local and state divestment campaigns in cities across the United States before it could be effectively mobilized for the national campaign for sanctions.
According to Falwell and the ACLJ lawyers, pastors should be allowed to campaign for a candidate for political office, encourage their followers to support that candidate and still remain free from federal income taxation, unlike all other groups and individuals that support candidates for public offices.
Bowman & Associates of Fayetteville won best of show for its campaign for National Bank of Springdale.
"KAHSA is thinking long term; this is not just a one-year shot," said Jill Sittenauer, media and administrative director of Jones, Seel and Huyett, the Topeka-based advertising, marketing and public relations firm that implemented the campaign for the association.
Jubilee 2000 must live on to harvest the fruit of the promises of remission so far made in general terms, and then to merge with the wider campaign for the eradication of poverty, launched by Britain's Minister for International Development, Clare Short.
The Web site of Common Cause (www.commoncause.org/publications/campaign_finance.htm), the organization that for 25 years has been the mainspring of the campaign for election finance reform, features alarmist head-lines such as "Ka-Ching: National Parties Raise Record $160.5 Million in Soft Money Through First 15 Months of 2000 Election Cycle." The Committee for Economic Development (www.ced.org), a voice of the business establishment, is equally concerned, blaming the "vast sums of unregulated 'soft money'" for all the ills of the current electoral process and advocating fundamental reforms to "restore trust and balance."
Access to money or possession of wealth should not be the prerequisite to conducting a viable campaign for public office."
Full browser ?