camp follower

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camp follower

1. A civilian who follows a military unit from one location to the next, either because the person is closely related to a service member or to unofficially provide goods or services to members of the unit. Daniel spent his childhood as a camp follower. His father was in the army, so he and his mother had to move a lot.
2. A person who supports a group or cause without officially belonging to its organization. I always vote Republican, but I'm a camp follower—I'm registered as an Independent.
See also: camp, follower

camp follower

1. A civilian who follows or settles near a military camp, especially a prostitute who does so. For example, The recruits were told not to associate with camp followers. [Early 1800s]
2. A person who sympathizes with a cause or group but does not join it. For example, She's only a camp follower so we can't count on her for a contribution.
See also: camp, follower

a camp follower

You call someone a camp follower when they follow or spend time with a particular person or group, either because they admire or support them, or because they hope to gain advantages from them. Brecht was surrounded by `camp-followers' — crowds of women who seemed to adore him. Even in my day as a player, we had our camp followers. Note: This expression is often used to show disapproval. Note: Originally, camp followers were civilians who travelled with an army and who made their living selling goods or services to the soldiers.
See also: camp, follower
References in periodicals archive ?
The Hindi speaking courtiers and camp followers very cunningly posed it to be a separate language to ensure the continuity of their privileged status and vested group interests in changing dynastic political environments.
Netanyahu and his camp followers here do not really want a war now.
The study then turns to a third section in which the author considers the involvement of children in three transatlantic components during the war: the maritime service, as camp followers of mercenary forces, and diplomatic missions to Europe.
They were driven off by some of the camp followers with clubs and tent poles.
Alas, the world economic crisis overtook everything, and the June 2009 congress drew just over 200 delegates, not counting partners, journalists and assorted camp followers.
The State of the City address was delivered among a friendly crowd of political supporters and various Spring Street camp followers at the Balqon Electric Truck factory in Harbor City.
If its new owners create a dream team it might attract camp followers but will never stir emotions the same way as Arsenal, Liverpool, United or even Villa.
She describes what it was like to be a woman in Canada and the United States in 1812; how the wives of soldiers and officers fared during the conflict; and the experience of women as nurses, combatants, agents, camp followers, and even POWs.
The worker-managed firm idea attracted much interest and many camp followers around the world.
Although awarded the Golden Lion at the Venice fest, it will appeal only to the most faithful of the director's camp followers.
Often, especially in the forts, camp followers became soldiers--for when husbands fell beside the cannons that they manned, wounded or killed by the enemy, wives took up their posts, loading and firing over the fortress walls.
According to the Greek historian Herodotus, the Persian invaders numbered more than two million fighting men, camp followers, and engineers.
Its army of camp followers rate it as King of the Mountains thanks to its awesome off-road abilities and would not cross the street to look at another 4x4Whose dream car?
What sort of a tizzy fit would he throw without aides and camp followers to tell him how good he was?
The disruption and insecurity of daily life caused by the war led to the formation of large groups of female camp followers, poor rural women who loaded their cooking utensils and other housekeeping items on their backs, and set out after their men, who had left home to join the revolutionary militias.