camel through the eye of a needle

camel through the eye of a needle

Used as part of a comparison to indicate that something is impossible or extremely difficult to accomplish. Taken from the passage in the Bible (Luke 18:25), "For it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the kingdom of God." You'd have an easier time getting a camel through the eye of a needle than getting them to agree on the issue.
See also: camel, eye, needle, of, through
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

camel through a needle's eye, a

An impossibility. The whole phrase, which comes from the Gospels of St. Matthew (19:24) and St. Mark (10:25), states that it is easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle than for a rich man to enter into the Kingdom of God. Variants appear in both Jewish religious writings and in the Islamic Koran. The thought is repeated by Shakespeare in Richard II (5.5): “It is as hard to come as for a camel to thread the postern of a small needle’s eye.”
See also: camel, through
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
It seems the 6ft birthing boards will be placed so Katie can see them while in the throes of labour, which I imagine must be the physical equivalent of passing a "camel through the eye of a needle".
Or as the New Testament says: It is easier to lead a camel through the eye of a needle than to get a wealthy person through the gates of heaven.
By repackaging light as molecular disturbances known as excitons, researchers have accomplished the equivalent of passing a camel through the eye of a needle. In this remarkable scheme for "slimming down" light to get it through a tiny opening, an incoming beam strikes a microscopic crystal wedged in the narrow end of a tapered, open-ended tube to generate excitons.