call

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call

1. verb To challenge or confront someone. If your intern keeps coming in late, you need to call her.
2. noun A prediction or guess. Whew, look at all that traffic over there! Not taking the highway sure was a good call.
3. noun The initial effects of a drug. No, I got the call on that right away—I feel great!

call

1. n. a decision; a prediction. The market behaved just as you said it would. Good call.
2. tv. to challenge someone. I called him, but he ignored me.
3. n. the early effects of a drug; the beginning of a rush; a rush. (Drugs.) You may not get the call on this stuff for twenty minutes or more.

call

in/into question
To raise doubts about.
See:
References in classic literature ?
Every day we were in the Gardens we paid a call at the nest, taking care that no cruel boy should see us, and we dropped crumbs, and soon the bird knew us as friends, and sat in the nest looking at us kindly with her shoulders hunched up.
The object might exist without the thought, but not the thought without the object: the three elements of act, content and object are all required to constitute the one single occurrence called "thinking of St.
William James's view was first set forth in an essay called "Does
Those, however, which arise from causes easily rendered ineffective are called affections, not qualities.
There may be other sorts of quality, but those that are most properly so called have, we may safely say, been enumerated.
In precisely the same way, your country of Two Dimensions is not spacious enough to represent me, a being of Three, but can only exhibit a slice or section of me, which is what you call a Circle.
I mean that every Point in you -- for you are a Square and will serve the purpose of my illustration -- every Point in you, that is to say in what you call your inside, is to pass upwards through Space in such a way that no Point shall pass through the position previously occupied by any other Point; but each Point shall describe a straight Line of its own.
But my old man had the third Tartar to deal with still; and seeing he did not fly, as he expected, nor come on to fight him, as he apprehended, but stood stock still, the old man stood still too, and fell to work with his tackle to charge his pistol again: but as soon as the Tartar saw the pistol away he scoured, and left my pilot, my champion I called him afterwards, a complete victory.
Seeing me bloody, he would see how I was hurt; but it was not much, only what we call a broken head; neither did I afterwards find any great inconvenience from the blow, for it was well again in two or three days.
He was so pleased with it, that he would call his lady and his two daughters to hear it, and it made mirth enough among them, you may be sure.
'Well, miss,' says she, 'and what are you at work upon?' The word miss was a language that had hardly been heard of in our school, and I wondered what sad name it was she called me.
What followed is told differently in different books, but all agree in this, that a great chief called Fergus came back from the dead in order to tell the tale, which was again written down.
The messenger replied that he knew of a much finer bull called Donn Chuailgne, or Brown Bull of Cooley, which belonged to Dawra, the chief of Ulster.
One day, bending over him, her hair (drying from a salt-water swim) flying about him, the one-woman, her two hands holding his head and jowls so that his ribbon of kissing tongue just missed her nose in the empty air, sang to him: "'Don't know what to call him, but he's mighty lak' a rose!'"
But, though tranquillity was restored above-stairs, it was not so below; where my landlady, highly resenting the injury done to the beauty of her husband by the flesh-spades of Mrs Honour, called aloud for revenge and justice.