call in question, to

call in question

Also, call into question. Dispute, challenge; also, cast doubt on. For example, How can you call her honesty into question? This usage was first recorded in John Lyly's Euphues (1579): "That ... I should call in question the demeanour of all."
See also: call, question
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

call in question, to

To challenge or cast doubt on the truth of something. Since the simple verb “to question” suffices, this wordier version, a translation of the Latin in dubium vocare used in legal language, is unnecessary. It has been used since the sixteenth century, by John Lyly in Euphues (“That I should call in question the demeanour call it a day, to of all”), by Shakespeare in As You Like It (5.2), and many others.
See also: call
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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