call in question, to

call in question

Also, call into question. Dispute, challenge; also, cast doubt on. For example, How can you call her honesty into question? This usage was first recorded in John Lyly's Euphues (1579): "That ... I should call in question the demeanour of all."
See also: call, question

call in question, to

To challenge or cast doubt on the truth of something. Since the simple verb “to question” suffices, this wordier version, a translation of the Latin in dubium vocare used in legal language, is unnecessary. It has been used since the sixteenth century, by John Lyly in Euphues (“That I should call in question the demeanour call it a day, to of all”), by Shakespeare in As You Like It (5.2), and many others.
See also: call