call attention to (someone or something)

(redirected from call attention to one)

call attention to (someone or something)

To draw others' awareness to someone or something. I know you were trying to sneak into the meeting, but you really called attention to yourself when you knocked over that chair. That garish new paint color really calls attention to all the imperfections in the walls.
See also: attention, call
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

call someone's attention to something

 and call something to someone's attention
to bring something to someone's notice; to make someone recognize some fact. May I call your attention to the sign on the door? He called to our attention the notice on the wall.
See also: attention, call

call attention to someone or something

to cause someone, including oneself, or something to be noticed or observed. I think he dresses like that simply to call attention to himself.
See also: attention, call
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In particular, I want to call attention to one of the fundamental prescriptions that the IMF and other multilateral donors have consistently peddled since the 1980s when the policy regime known as neo-liberalism displaced the Keynes-inspired orthodoxies of the post-WWII period.
Crisel said she wanted to take advantage of the rare chance to show her gratitude in public to the people who helped her clinch the award as much as use the unique platform to call attention to one of her advocacies.
The point of all this description is not to call attention to one evening in the long and sometime chaotic New York City social whirl.
In spite of bitter history, two of the thirteen scholars in their co-authored piece "Institutional Causes of the India-Pakistan Rivalry," Reta Chowdhari Tremblay and Julian Schofield, briefly call attention to one area of exceptional cooperation between New Delhi and Islamabad, the resolution of the Indus River's water disputes and the persistent maintenance and operation of the Indus Basin's vast irrigation works, the most massive and complicated in the world.
There may be a tendency for someone to say, "I'm keeping my head down" so as not to call attention to one's self, hoping that they'll be spared the ax.
My purpose in engaging Baker's article is neither revisional nor agonistic: I wish to call attention to one revealing aspect of his argument rather than to contest or add to it.