caboose


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caboose

(kəˈbus)
n. the buttocks. (From the name of the car at the end of a railroad train.) You just plunk your caboose over there on the settee and listen up to what I have to tell you.
References in periodicals archive ?
Louis board of aldermen, she heard from many quarters that she was too young and that, moreover, she needed to go to the back of the line and wait her turn to run for office--the caboose once again.
Because he does, he ends up making the history of American childhood a mere caboose on a train whose direction it is powerless to affect.
She was surrounded by some of the finest young brains in the business that would ultimately go on to lead global conglomerates themselves and, as she likes to say, "It was a locomotive that was moving--I could be the engine or the caboose.
After returning home, he moves to Canada and lives an odd and reclusive life in an old caboose, living largely off the land.
Our troop train consisted of a steam locomotive with 10 to 15 passenger cars and a caboose at the end of the train where the brakeman and conductor rode.
Recent buyers worry that they might be riding in the equity train's caboose, and those trying to buy for the first time fret over that event horizon is moving farther into the future.
The Izaak Walton offers renovated Caboose Cabin accommodations in addition to the hotel.
As for pain, engine of the true poetic strain,/he confines it to the caboose,/the last car on the train.
Just add books to Levenger's Book Caboose, a suede-trimmed khaki tote that is filled with things you'd expect such as a felt-tipped liner, pencils, an eraser, stick-on notes, a notepad and a pencil sharpener.
Second, it isolates the contribution to productivity and lower costs of a crucially important technological innovation implemented in the years shortly after deregulation, (2) namely, the ability to run trains with crews of two members, rather than four or five, and the elimination of the caboose, traditionally needed both for safety at the end of a freight train and as quarters for the two or three crew members now technologically obsolete.
These include the Old Railroad Depot in downtown Tuscumbia on 5th Street even though the tracks have been removed except for a small section where a static display of a caboose and boxcar are located and a curious pattern of old weathered asphalt on 5th Street revealing where the old roadbed is located.
The trains had lithographed passenger and freight sets in bright colors, with orange box cars, red gondolas, and an ivory and tan caboose.
Those of the public who wanted to go West could take such accommodation as the caboose or the cars loaded with ties or rails afforded.
This final tweak: Move that only (last sentence) to the caboose.