bystander apathy

bystander apathy

A social psychological phenomenon in which the more people there are viewing a crisis or crime, the less likely they are to offer aid to the victim(s). Also known as the bystander effect. Over 30 people saw the mugging take place, but due to bystander apathy, none of them intervened.
See also: bystander
References in periodicals archive ?
Bystander apathy is a social, psychological view that people are less likely to help when other people are present.
CHARITIES have warned that "bystander apathy" can compound the problem of sexual assault.
This was the period of professional and public arguments over the use of psychotropic and antipsychotic drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, psychosurgery, as well as issues such as the role of personality and genetics in human behaviour, children's emotional development, obedience and bystander apathy, the relationship between cinema and psychosis, psychology's role in defining sexuality and women's oppression, the popularisation of psychotherapy, and the anti-psychiatry movement.
No one has a right to bystander apathy. Perhaps people don't want to call the police about someone they love or know.
Overcoming Bystander Apathy and Non-intervention in Alcohol-Poisoning Emergency Situations: Advancing Field Testing of Training-for-Intervention Theory via Thought Experiments.
Social psychology documented the "bystander apathy effect" in the 1960s, a phenomenon in which the more people who witness a crisis together, the less likely any one of them is to help.
But bystander apathy is, in fact, a well-documented phenomenon whereby those witnessing a crime fail to help a victim.
She cited a famous study of 'bystander apathy': two psychologists placed students in a room and asked them to fill out questionnaires.
Additionally, future researchers are encouraged to include interventions specifically targeted toward reducing bystander apathy (Latane & Darley, 1968) by encouraging bystanders to become more involved in helping bullying victims.
To escape the quicksand of bystander apathy, managers and directors can be required to report on strategic and operational issues.
The question for us today is whether bystander apathy is happening in naval-aviation radio communications.
The perceived relationship between an attacker and their victim is a factor that may impact on bystander apathy towards witnessed assaults (e.g.
"Most just looked at the floor while others fidgeted in their seats," she says, shocked at this bystander apathy.