by the time

by the time

At the time when something happens that is after another event or situation has already passed or occurred. By the time she realized she had cancer, it had already spread. If you don't have this mess cleaned up by the time I get home, you're going to be in serious trouble!
See also: by, time
References in classic literature ?
By the time the occasion came for the enrolling of my name, an idea occurred to me which I thought would make me equal to the situation; and so, when the teacher asked me what my full name was, I calmly told him "Booker Washington," as if I had been called by that name all my life; and by that name I have since been known.
How should you adjust your watch by the time you reach Miami?
Sometimes, by the time other responsibilities allow access what students have posted, their interest has evaporated.
If he is able to do these things by the time he arrives, putting together protection and punt coverage won't be a problem.
The celebrated English dancer and choreographer had pretty much cashed in after a remarkable career by the time he received the magazine's award in 1981.
By the time the meetings ended, there had been a complete turnaround in attitude.
For this technique the imposed strain deformation is the sum of several sinusoidal responses are represented by the time dependent strain presented below.
(By the time you reach reps 6 or 7, it will be intense!).
The McGraw-Hill Through-Block, between Sixth and Seventh Avenues, The New Victory Theater and 1 Times Square took the top spots in the first Design Times Square, a new annual design competition sponsored by the Times Square Alliance.
Tardy by more than a year, the semi-mea-culpa article by the Times editors--while failing to provide any forthright explanation of Chalabi's role as a chronic source for Miller's prewar stories--appeared a week after the U.S.
Among the neglected waters probed by the Times is the federal agency beat covered by Ruth Larson.
Only afterwards did the other papers marvel at the accuracy of John Zogby, the pollster heavily cited by the Times and ignored by everyone else.
A 35-seat auditorium, operated by the Times company, will also be located on the ground floor level.
When completed, about 3,500 people are expected to work in the new building: some 2,500 New York Times Company employees, including many who will be relocated from the building at 229 West 43rd Street occupied by the Times Company since 1913; and approximately 1,000 people In the stores and offices leased by FCRC.
The federal bureaucracy, a beat often given short shrift at the Post, has been taken seriously by the Times. To lead the charge, the Times hired someone who really knew it, Mark Tapscott, assistant director of public affairs at the Office of Personnel Management under Reagan.