by name

by name

1. By stating the specific name of someone or something. When you get there, just ask for Joe by name—he'll be expecting you.
2. In the sense of knowing one's name, as opposed to simply recognizing their face. It's pretty impressive that she knows every single student by name—there are hundreds!
See also: by, name

by ˈname

using the name of somebody/something: She asked for you by name.The principal knows all the students by name.I only know her by name (= I have heard about her but I have not met her).
See also: by, name
References in periodicals archive ?
2 : to refer to by the word by which a person or thing is known : call by name <Can you name all the state capitals?>
To obtain additional insured status, the certificate must identify the recipient's company by name and designate it as an "additional insured." Alternatively, the company should review the named insured's policy to determine whether it contains a "broad form" additional insured endorsement, which typically applies to "insured contracts" with the named insured.
Read it to ensure that the certificate identifies your company by name and as an additional insured.
The first question asked when we were presented to the church for Baptism was, "What name have you given this child?" As a pastor, I want to be able to call individuals by name. With a few thousand parishioners, though, I find name reminders to be necessary.
But instead of just identifying them in column A, let's actually rename B1 through B5 so we can identify the data by name.
Although several women were mentioned in the records, almost all remained nameless whereas their husbands were often fully identified by name and occupational title, even though the transactions in question took place with the anonymous women themselves.
Coimbra's tax roll from 1610--1613 had 1,573 individuals listed by name, of whom 325 were women.
There is nothing in Coimbra's tax roll that explains why 256 women were identified by name, 69 by name and trade, and another 115 left nameless but with a good proportion connected to their work.
The best example of this phenomenon is, of course, the numerous cases where a man was named whereas his wife, although mentioned, was not identified by name. The entry of Sebastiao Fernandes, shearer, and wife, baker, is a perfect example.
But Robert Childs, a director and partner with Hiscox plc, noted that 1989 and 1990, among the worst years in Lloyd's history, occurred in a market fully capitalized by Names. As for Names' comparative profits in recent years, Childs said they represent "a rump on the better-performing syndicates"--Names who can't be ousted from their profitable trading positions but can't claim any credit for those syndicates' success.
But, to return to the precepts of Henderson's article: The emancipatory impulses illustrated by names in these novels disrupt, delegitimize, and displace Master narratives; they do not make them or their conditions of possibility disappear.