by heart


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by heart

Completely; by memory. Often used in reference to something that one has memorized or knows very well. Ask Becky to recite the poem—she knows it by heart. I can't sing that song in front of an audience if I don't know the words by heart!
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by heart

Also, by rote. From memory; also, mechanically. For example, Betty had trouble learning the song by heart, but her teacher insisted on it, or Japanese schools put heavy emphasis on learning by rote. These terms are often put as know by heart or learn by rote . The first term was already used by Chaucer (in Troilus and Cressida). The variant, also dating from the 1300s, often implies mere memorization without deeper understanding. Both phrases remain in use, although this form of learning is no longer so widespread as it once was. Also see commit to memory.
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by heart

from memory.
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by ˈheart

(British English also off by ˈheart) using only your memory: There was a time when I knew the whole poem by heart.
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by heart

Learned by rote; memorized word for word.
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