by and large


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by and large

In general; overall. It's a really cute town, and I like it by and large, but it's just so far from all of my friends in the city.
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by and large

generally; usually. (Originally a nautical expression.) I find that, by and large, people tend to do what they are told to do. By and large, rosebushes need lots of care.
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by and large

For the most part, generally speaking, as in By and large the novel was a success. This expression originated in 17th-century seamanship, where it referred to sailing into the wind and then off it, which made it easier to steer. By the early 1700s the term had been broadened to mean "in one direction and another," whence its present meaning of "in general." For a synonym, see for the most part.
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by and large

on the whole; everything considered.
Originally this phrase was used in a nautical context, describing the handling of a ship both to the wind and off it.
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by and ˈlarge

(informal) used when you are saying something that is generally, but not completely, true: By and large, I enjoyed my time at school.
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by and large

Generally speaking, on the whole. The expression comes from seamanship. When a vessel is close-hauled (sails as close as possible to the wind), “by and large” instructs the helmsman to sail slightly off the wind, making it easier to steer. Because this instruction is rather vague, the term eventually came to mean “in general.”
See also: and, by, large