butt (up) against (someone or something)

(redirected from butting against)

butt (up) against (someone or something)

1. To be positioned physically next to someone or something. The table is just a little too long—it butts up against the wall over here. Our neighbor's new addition butts against our bushes, unfortunately.
2. To crash into someone or something. My daughter got hurt when another girl on the soccer field butted against her. My car is in the shop because I butted up against a barricade on the highway.
See also: butt

butt (up) against someone or something

to press against someone or something firmly. This board is supposed to butt up against the one over there. The goat butted against Fred, but didn't hurt him.
See also: butt
References in periodicals archive ?
Here I removed the stock from a Model 700 Remington rifle and placed the action upside down to align the part over the receiver with one end butting against the recoil lug.
In a clear reference to French soccer hero Zinedine Zidane's infamous head butting against Italian player Marco Materazzi in the World Cup final in July, Prodi said the two countries needed to avoid "headbutts to the chest" to preserve their strong ties in various fields.
In so doing, they are butting against official Methodist Church doctrine, which holds that homosexuality is "incompatible with Christian teaching."
Stairs constructed as part of a wall project can be built with the tread interlocking into the cheek walls or butting against the cheek walls.
"They are butting against a system in business and in life that's not set up to deal with an increasing sense of individuality," he says.
These mounts slide over the barrel and enclose its entire length, butting against the front of the frame.
He has already served one three-match ban in Europe this season after being convicted of head- butting against Dynamo Kiev on video evidence.
All of the little "special" things about all of our personalities immediately rear themselves and start butting against each other the same way they did when we were kids.
While this material has been covered extensively, helmer lends its retelling considerable impact -- and scenes of latter-day Danish historian Ole Sohn (who wrote a book on Munch-Petersen) butting against current Moscow bureaucrats to access old documents suggest much of the same paranoid secrecy remains operative in post-glasnost Russia.