butcher

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(as) fit as a butcher's dog

In excellent physical health. A butcher's dog would be well nourished from eating plentiful scraps of meat. Primarily heard in UK. I've seen that fella at the gym before. Trust me—he's as fit as a butcher's dog. My grandma has been rowing her whole life. She turns 87 this year and she's still fit as a butcher's dog. Yes, I did have surgery a few months ago, but I've completed my physical therapy and am as fit as a butcher's dog now.
See also: dog, fit

a butcher boy play

baseball A maneuver in which the batter acts as if they are going to bunt in order to draw the basemen closer, then pulls the bat back and attempts to hit the ball as normal. With the bases loaded, Wilkins executed a butcher boy play that brought in teammate Rob Thompson for a go-ahead run. Smith ended up being an easy out because none of the infielders were fooled by that butcher boy play. A butcher boy play would have worked, if not for the pitcher cleanly fielding the ball and throwing Jensen out.
See also: boy, butcher, play

be (as) fit as a butcher's dog

To be in excellent physical health. A butcher's dog would be well nourished from eating plentiful scraps of meat. Primarily heard in UK. I've seen that fella at the gym before. Trust me—he's as fit as a butcher's dog.
See also: dog, fit

butcher boy

baseball A maneuver in which the batter acts as if they are going to bunt in order to draw the basemen closer, then pulls the bat back and attempts to hit the ball as normal. Sometimes hyphenated and used as a modifier. With the bases loaded, Wilkins executed a butcher boy that brought in teammate Rob Thompson for a go-ahead run. Jackson managed to get a butcher-boy single on the opening pitch of the game!
See also: boy, butcher

have a butcher's

To look at something. The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "butcher's hook" rhymes with "look." Primarily heard in UK. Come, have a butcher's at this—does it look infected to you?
See also: have

old enough to bleed, old enough to butcher

rude If a girl has begun to menstruate, then she is old enough to have sex and get pregnant. As someone who first got her period at age 11, I find "old enough to bleed, old enough to butcher" deeply horrifying. I can't fathom anyone thinking a girl would be ready to have sex at that age!
See also: butcher, enough, old, to

take a butcher's

To look at something. The phrase comes from rhyming slang in which "butcher's hook" rhymes with "look." Primarily heard in UK. Come, take a butcher's at this—does it look infected to you?
See also: take

the butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker

People of all ethnicities, professions, and socioeconomic classes. The aim of our program is to draw in and appeal to people from all walks of life—the butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker, as the rhyme goes.

wood butcher

slang A carpenter or woodworker, especially someone who is inexperienced or unskilled. I'd had a bit of training from my dad, so the company appointed me as their go-to wood butcher whenever they needed something slapped together real quick. Make sure you hire someone who knows what they're doing. I don't want some wood butcher building our new patio!
See also: butcher, wood
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2022 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

the butcher, the baker, the candlestick-maker

people of all kinds.
This phrase comes from the traditional nursery rhyme Rub-dub-dub, Three men in a tub .

have a butcher's

have a look. British informal
Butcher's comes here from butcher's hook , rhyming slang for ‘look’.
See also: have
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

have/take a ˈbutcher’s

(British English, slang) have a look at something: Come over here and have a butcher’s at this!This phrase comes from rhyming slang, in which butcher’s hook stands for ‘look’.
See also: have, take
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

wood butcher

n. a carpenter. See if you can get a wood butcher to fix this broken panel.
See also: butcher, wood
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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