bust

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bust

1. verb, informal To smash or break something with force. I had to use a shovel to bust the large clumps of ice that had formed around the wheels of my truck.
2. verb, informal To cause something to be inoperable or unusable; to break something. I think I busted my laptop when I dropped it earlier. It won't turn on for me.
3. verb, informal To break apart. The vase toppled off the table and busted into a dozen pieces.
4. verb, slang To injure a part of one's body. I tripped and busted my lip on the concrete step. Those two goons busted up my arm after I refused to pay the money.
5. verb, slang To punch, strike, or thrash someone or something. He said he would bust my face open if I ever said that about his mother again.
6. verb, slang To catch or apprehend someone for doing something illegal, illicit, or not allowed. The police finally busted the guy who had stolen all that money. I heard Tommy's parents busted him while he was smoking a joint.
7. verb, slang To raid a location in search of something illegal or illicit. Police busted one of the cartel's largest drug-processing compounds today, arresting more than 20 people and seizing more than $2.5 million worth of cocaine.
8. noun, slang A police raid on a location in search of something illegal or illicit. Today's bust led to the arrest of more than 20 people and the seizure of more than $2.5 million worth of cocaine.
9. noun, dated slang An indulgence of wild or celebratory activity, especially involving heavy alcohol consumption. We went on a quite a bust once the job was finished. Started on Friday and didn't stop drinking till morning. The university has been clamping down at beer busts held at the various fraternities and sororities around the campus.

bust (one)

To arrest one for an illegal act. The police busted us for underage drinking.
See also: bust
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bust

(one's) ass (to do something) and break one's balls to do something; bust one's butt to do something; bust one's nuts to do something Sl. to work very hard to do something. (The expressions with balls and nuts are said typically, but not necessarily, of a male. Potentially offensive. Use only with discretion.) I've been busting my nuts to get this thing done on time, and now they don't want it! The new boss expects you to bust your nuts every minute you are at work at the warehouse.

bust

(someone's) balls Go to break (someone's) balls.

bust

(someone's) stones Go to break (someone's) balls.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bust

verb
See busted

bust

1. n. a failure. The whole project was a bust from the beginning.
2. tv. to reduce someone’s rank. (Originally military, now also in civilian use as with the police.) The brass busted her on the spot.
3. n. a riotous drinking party. There was a big bust in the park until two in the morning.
4. n. a raid by the police. I knew it was a bust the minute they broke in the door.
5. tv. [for the police] to raid a place. The bacon busted Bill’s bar and put Bill in the slammer.
6. tv. to arrest someone. The feds finally busted Frank on a tax rap.
7. n. an arrest. The bust was carried off without much stress.
8. tv. to inform on someone, leading to an arrest. Tom busted Sam because there’s bad blood between them.
9. n. the police. Here comes the bust. Beat it!
10. Go to busted.

busted

1. and bust mod. arrested. Harry the Horse is bust again. The third time this month. How many times you been busted for speeding?
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. I went to a beer bust and got busted.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

bust (one's)

ass/balls/butt Vulgar Slang
To make a strenuous effort; work very hard.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
See:
References in classic literature ?
"It's the Napoleon bust business again," said Lestrade.
"It all seems to centre round that bust of Napoleon which I bought for this very room about four months ago.
"And what became of the bust?" asked Holmes, after a careful study of this picture.
Are you coming with us to see the remains of your bust, Mr.
The spat where the fragments of the bust had been found was only a few hundred yards away.
The possession of this trifling bust was worth more, in the eyes of this strange criminal, than a human life.
But I wish to call your attention very particularly to the position of this house, in the garden of which the bust was destroyed."
Barnicot's bust was broken not far from his red lamp.
Sherlock Holmes and I walked together to the High Street, where we stopped at the shop of Harding Brothers, whence the bust had been purchased.
The cast was taken in two moulds from each side of the face, and then these two profiles of plaster of Paris were joined together to make the complete bust. The work was usually done by Italians, in the room we were in.
It was a bust of Napoleon, like the one which we had seen that morning, and it had been broken into similar fragments.
You wrote to me about a bust that is in my possession."
I only gave fifteen shillings for the bust, and I think you ought to know that before I take ten pounds from you.
I brought the bust up with me, as you asked me to do.
It is simply to say that you transfer every possible right that you ever had in the bust to me.