bust out


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bust out

1. slang To escape from a place or thing (often prison). The criminal busted out, but he was caught only a few miles from the prison.
2. slang To help one to escape from a place or thing (often prison). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." We can't just leave him here to rot in a jail cell—we have to bust him out! Don't worry, I'll pull the fire alarm and bust you out of detention.
3. To bring out something for use. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." Bust out the champagne—we've got an engagement to celebrate!
4. To produce or create something very quickly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." He's been busting out a new book in his popular sci-fi series nearly every year. No parties for me this weekend. I just need to sit down and bust out this essay.
5. To suddenly perform a particular action. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." My mother seemed fine this morning but then busted out crying at the funeral. The kids busted out laughing when the clown fell down on stage.
6. To seem to pop out of something, especially clothes that are too small. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." I'm sorry, but that top just doesn't fit you—you're practically busting out of it!
7. To dismiss or expel someone from school. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "bust" and "out." The committee evaluating the plagiarism charges ultimately decided to bust the student out of school.
See also: bust, out

bust out (of some place)

Sl. to break out of some place, especially a prison. (Bust is a nonstandard form of burst meaning 'break' here.) Somehow the gangsters busted out of prison and left the country. They busted out together.
See also: bust, out

bust someone out of some place

 and bust someone out 
1. Sl. to help someone escape from prison. (Bust is a non-standard form of burst meaning 'break' here.) Lefty did not manage to bust Max out of prison. Lefty wanted to bust out some of his friends.
2. Sl to expel or force someone to withdraw from school. (Bust is a nonstandard form of burst meaning 'break' here.) The clean finally busted Bill out of school. The clean busted out the students with very low grades.
See also: bust, of, out, place

bust out

verb
See also: bust, out

bust out (of some place)

in. to break out of some place, especially a prison. (Bust is a nonstandard form of burst meaning “break” here.) Somehow the gangsters busted out of prison and left the country.
See also: bust, of, out, place
References in periodicals archive ?
Beaten a head by Istabraq in the December Festival Hurdle 2001, Bust Out was sidelined due to a leg injury until returning to action this season.
Meanwhile, Bust Out's stable- companion Moscow Flyer remains on course for the Queen Mother Champion Chase, for which he has been favourite all season.
Bust Out gamely held the challenge of Native Scout by a length after
Paddy Power went 10-1 (from 12)for the Arkle Trophy at Cheltenham while Sean Graham, who cut faller Alexander Milenium to 16-1 (from 25) for the same race, left Bust Out's price unchanged at 16-1.
However, those bold enough to back the triple Champion Hurdle winner at 4-11 were given a fright by Bust Out who fought all the way to the line despite being hampered by the second-flight fall of Liss A Paoraigh.
Jessica Harrington, thrilled with Bust Out's performance, is considering taking advantage of Istabraq's probable absence to come back here for the AIG Europe Champion Hurdle on January 27.
"Bust Out is much bigger, but his jumping is not as quick as Moscow's.
In assessing Bust Out's performance, she added, "Barry said he had to make his move early and he idled from the last.
Best known for almost upsetting Istabraq in the 2001 December Festival Hurdle, Bust Out ran another JP McManus-owned big name, Le Coudray, to half a length in the Denny Gold Medal Novice Chase last month.
A year ago Bust Out's trainer Jessica Harrington, who also runs Soltero in the Grade 1 event, saw her Moscow Flyer, who started odds-on favourite, fall at the fifth fence in the Irish Arkle before landing the more prestigious Cheltenham version.
Two fences earlier two other possible dangers were removed when Bust Out's stablemate, Soltero, and I Got It, both of whom were in contention, fell.
CLOSE: Bust Out, narrowly beaten by Istabraq; EACH WAY CHANCE: Liss A Paoraigh
Was Ameriland putting together a "bust out?" I don't know.
Bust Out, who has won four of his nine races and finished out of the money only once, is the second horse the syndicate has had with Jessica Harrington after a successful initial venture with Miss Orchestra, who gave them a day to savour when winning the 1998 Midlands Grand National at Uttoxeter.
This five-year-old showed distinct promise at Fairyhouse recently when finishing fourth behind Bust Out in a competitive maiden event.