business as usual


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business as usual

The typical proceedings. The phrase is sometimes but not always used to indicate that things have returned to normal after something unforeseen or unpleasant has happened. Once these auditors are out of our hair, we can get back to business as usual. A: "How are things at the office?" B: "Business as usual. Nothing exciting has happened lately."
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business as usual

having things go along as usual. Even right after the flood, it was business as usual in all the stores. Please, everyone, business as usual. Let's get back to work.
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business as usual

The normal course of some activity, as in The fire destroyed only a small section of the store, so it's business as usual. This term originated as an announcement that a commercial establishment was continuing to operate in spite of fire, construction, or some similar interruption. It had been extended to broader use by 1914, when Winston Churchill said in a speech: "The maxim of the British people is 'Business as usual,'" which became a slogan for the rest of World War I. Today it may be used in this positive sense and also pejoratively, as in Never mind that most civilians are starving to death-the ministry regards its job to be business as usual . [Late 1800s]
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business as usual

You say business as usual to mean that everything is continuing in the normal way, even though something unpleasant or unexpected has happened. Asked if the President was trying to suggest it was business as usual, Mr Fitzwater replied: It is business as usual; this isn't the kind of crisis that requires us to drop everything else. If these guys are convicted, it could be the beginning of a real change. If they're not, it's business as usual.
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it’s business as ˈusual

things continue normally, despite difficulties or disturbances: It was business as usual at the theatre yesterday, in spite of all the building work going on.
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business as usual

Proceeding as though things were normal when they actually are not. Presumably this expression came from the practice of posting a notice in an establishment announcing that its operations were continuing despite construction, fire, or some other hampering circumstance. From the time Winston Churchill said, in a speech in November 1914, “The maxim of the British people is ‘Business as usual,’” the expression was a slogan for the remainder of World War I. It later came to be used as a criticism—as, for example, when a public policy is continued even though it is no longer desirable or appropriate—and for blind complacency.
See also: business, usual
References in periodicals archive ?
The picture was tweeted by Chester City Police, who said it remains "business as usual" despite the disruption
Since 2006, Business As Usual (BAU / http://www.businessasusual.net) is a leading consultancy and training firm, specialized in Business Continuity, Risk Management, IT Service Continuity and Disaster Recovery.
The handicapper's response has been to put Business As Usual up 7lb to a mark of 95, but the bay can summon the improvement needed to stay ahead of his British Horseracing Authority nemesis.
But what should be business as usual will become a bit trickier from July 1 onwards, when the International Ship and Port Facility Security code, known as ISPS, takes affect here.
The focus of the white paper is on "recovery and resumption of clearance and settlement activities for material open transactions in wholesale financial markets," not the resumption of business as usual retail banking or trading functions.
What reality checks are the band writing for themselves to make it not business as usual?
In light of 9-11, a strategy of "business as usual" may be the riskiest and least productive strategy of all, because there is nothing "usual" about the opportunities that lie ahead in the agricultural markets, and nothing "usual" about the contextual forces at work.
It is definitely not business as usual. The rapid rise of the Internet has been one of the most dramatic changes in the business world in the last 150 years, sending companies scrambling to adapt to a whole new way of working.
THE Government's bid to put the "business as usual" sign back up on the countryside is risky.
Using varying combinations of these policies, the CEF explores three possible scenarios for future energy use: "Business As Usual," "Moderate," and "Advanced." Under "Business As Usual," current energy policies continue more or less unchanged, with a "modest pace of technological progress." In the "Moderate" scenario, some reforms occur; and in the "Advanced" scenario, "a nationwide sense of urgency" motivates deeper reforms.
Despite the dispute, the houses were substantially full and the performances seemed oddly business as usual. The dancers all went through their familiar assignments with easy familiarity, and at the performance I attended some of the children's scenes even appeared to have more animation than usual.
While we expect that the industry may experience some minor or localized problems during the rollover, the Federal Reserve fully expects to conduct business as usual through the Year 2000.
To successfully work with this lucrative market requires a combination of international financial skills, the ability to establish cultural rapport and a willingness to acknowledge that working with affluent foreign nationals is a far cry from business as usual.
People start thinking in terms of "breaking out of the box" of "business as usual" and "turning breakdowns into breakthroughs." The killer response, "We've always done it that way," becomes, "Until now we've done it that way," followed by, "How can we do it better?"
They can be solved only by basic changes in attitude and behavior--by rejecting business as usual. And business as usual, despite his very sincere alarm, is just what Mitchell can't bring himself to reject.
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