bush

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bush

1. vulgar slang Pubic hair.
2. vulgar slang A woman as an object of sexual gratification. He spends most weekends in the clubs and bars, on the lookout for some easy bush.
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bush

1. n. the pubic hair. (Usually objectionable.) How old were you when you started growing a bush?
2. n. a woman considered as a receptacle for the penis. (Rude and derogatory.) Bubba says he gotta have some bush.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
It was some time before I could summon resolution to go down through the trees and bushes upon the flank of the headland to the beach.
Three times the young reporter sprang at Ed Handby and each time the bartender, catching him by the shoulder, hurled him back into the bushes. The older man seemed prepared to keep the exercise going indefinitely but George Willard's head struck the root of a tree and he lay still.
George heard the man and woman making their way through the bushes. As he crept down the hill- side his heart was sick within him.
Most significantly, the Bushes maneuvered the party through a careful, strategic use of race for political purposes, beginning with the elder's break with his family's genteel Republican tradition to oppose the Civil Rights Act of 1964, after some ostentatious soul-searching--a process that resembled his son's elaborate charade of considering all sides of the debate on stem-cell research before following the dictates of the religious right.
Fascism, as Mussolini defined it, is state corporatism, which is indeed the mantra of the Bushes. It is the subjugation of the individual to the machine with profit as the sole motivating factor.
Still, by jabbing at the Bush family pedigree, and by highlighting the issue of class, she shows how the Bushes have put one over on the American people: "They make themselves happily oblivious to the difference between thinking you are self-made and being self-made," Dowd writes, "between liking to clear brush and having to clear brush....
In Phillips's eyes, the Bushes represent the embodiment of a mortal danger to the American republic: "the advent of a Machiavelli-inclined dynasty ...
"It would seem to be no small coincidence that a tiny college club has somehow managed to spawn three presidents of the United States" -- William Howard Taft and the two George Bushes. The 2004 presidential race might involve two "Bonesmen" -- President Bush and Massachusetts Democratic Senator John Kerry.
It'll make you glad you never got invited to sit around the fireplace listening to the Bushes tell stories at Kennebunkport.
The program, which was unveiled with a splashy photo-op at a New York youth center, where the Bushes touchingly cradled babies and related to a once-stabbed teenager, was trumpeted with glowing reports on all three networks.
Come on!") But in this minimalist era, Bush's division of presidential labor was accorded the ultimate in solemnization-a Time magazine cover story heralding the president as "Men of the Year." "A Tale of Two Bushes," read the headline.
One was after the election, when the Bushes invited the traveling press corps over to their Kennebunkport home for wine and cheese on Thanksgiving weekend.