burst bubble


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burst (one's) bubble

To bring someone back to reality, especially if they are dreaming or fantasizing about something unrealistic. Look, I hate to burst your bubble, but there is no way you're getting into Harvard! You're a C student!
See also: bubble, burst

burst (someone's) bubble

To disprove, ruin, or eliminate someone's fantasy, delusion, misbelief, or recent happiness. Sorry to burst your bubble, Janet, but Sarah only went out on a date with you to make Suzie jealous. I'm happy you won, and I don't mean to burst your bubble while you're celebrating, but your opponent could use some encouragement.
See also: bubble, burst

burst someone's bubble

Fig. to destroy someone's illusion or delusion; to destroy someone's fantasy. I hate to burst your bubble, but Columbus did not discover Canada. Even if you think I am being foolish, please don't burst my bubble.
See also: bubble, burst
References in periodicals archive ?
Improvement more likely than not and entered in Coronation Stakes, but facing some promising fillies and this track has a tendency to burst bubbles.
In line with the philosophy of the "freedom of the fool," Willhelm plays the irreverent jester to the kings of the industry, challenging the establishment to think differently, daring to burst bubbles with truths that are only admitted in private.
Programmes which inspire children to burst bubbles and draw pictures will match their movements to prescribed therapy programmes, encouraging healing movements.
These are the unforeseen consequences that trigger crises, burst bubbles, systemic catastrophes--and alternate possibilities, too.
You have limited time and you have to burst bubbles to make as may words as possible to cross the target score.
The consequences of burst bubbles in Japan in the 1980's and in the United States last year are powerful reasons why China's government has acted with such determination, while the legacy of a functioning centralized system may explain why it has proven capable of doing so decisively.
The consequences of burst bubbles in Japan in the 1980s and in the United States last year are powerful reasons why China's government has acted with such determination, while the legacy of a functioning centralized system may explain why it has proven capable of doing so decisively.
Research carried out in Japan after its long period of recession and burst bubbles found that chasing a well-priced equity properly was returning around 3% a year, at a time when the markets those investors were operating in were performing at -4% annually.