burden with

burden (someone) with (something)

To share something distressing or troublesome with another person. I'm sorry to burden you with my problems, but I could really use some advice here. Don't burden her with that information now—wait until she's done with her exams.
See also: burden

burden someone or something with someone or something

to bother or weigh down someone or something with someone or something. Please don't burden us with the bad news at this time. I don't want to burden the school with a troublesome child.
See also: burden

burden someone with something

to give unpleasant information to someone; to give someone some bad news. I hate to burden you with this, but your cat ran away. I wish I had not been burdened with all the facts.
See also: burden
References in periodicals archive ?
Basu, and P Kulhara, "Family burden with substance dependence: a study from India," Indian Journal of Medical Research, vol.
For disruption of family interaction 58% care givers had moderate burden with 32% care givers of sever burden.
Comparison of the Severity of Family Burden with Years of Dependence
As shown in Table 6, the subjective burden with various socio-demographic variables was compared.
Family burden with substance dependence : A study from India.
At step 2 the interaction of subjective burden with objective burden and the interaction of subjective burden with severity of the mental illness were entered to examine whether the level of subjective burden moderated the relationship between objective burden and caregivers' rewards.
The significant predictors of instrumental support were the objective burden and the interaction of subjective burden with objective burden (Table 4).
The significant predictors of emotional support were the subjective burden and the interaction of subjective burden with objective burden.
Finally, an analysis of construct validity showed strong correlations of care-giving burden with depression of the carer and deviant behaviour of the patient.