burden of proof, the

burden of proof

The requirement and obligation of providing sound, reasonable evidence supporting a charge or allegation. Originating and used primarily in law, it can be applied more broadly to any situation in which a contentious dispute arises. In court, the burden of proof always rests on the plaintiffs and the prosecutors. The burden of proof is on you to show that the computer was broken before you bought it.
See also: burden, of, proof

burden of proof

Obligation of proving a disputed charge or allegation. For example, Are you sure you mailed the tax return on time? The burden of proof's on you. A legal term dating from the late 1500s, it has also been used more loosely in recent times.
See also: burden, of, proof

burden of proof, the

The obligation to support a contention by presenting adequate evidence. The term is a translation of the Latin onus probandi and was used in English courts of law from the late sixteenth century on. Transferred to any situation in which there was an obligation to prove something, it became a cliché in the nineteenth century. Attorney-novelist Scott Turow used it as the title for a popular novel involving a suicide and lawsuit (1990).
See also: burden, of