bundle


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bundle of energy

Someone who is exceptionally energetic, alert, productive, or hyperactive. My kids are always such bundles of energy first thing in the morning. Susan is a bundle of energy! She's already finished two of her essays today and is beginning to work on a third.
See also: bundle, energy, of

bundle of laughs

Fun, funny, and pleasant. Often used sarcastically to indicate that someone is unpleasant or not enjoyable to be around. A: "Is Mr. Grant always cranky?" B: "Oh, yeah—he's a real bundle of laughs!" I always have so much fun when Katie's around—she's totally a bundle of laughs!
See also: bundle, laugh, of

bundle of joy

A newborn baby. We threw a baby shower for Jessica today so she can get all she needs in preparation for her little bundle of joy.
See also: bundle, joy, of

be a bundle of laughs

To be fun, funny, and pleasant. Often used sarcastically to indicate that someone is unpleasant or not enjoyable to be around. A: "Is Mr. Grant always cranky?" B: "Oh, yeah—he's a real bundle of laughs!" I always have so much fun when Katie's around—she's a bundle of laughs!
See also: bundle, laugh, of

be a bundle of nerves

To be very nervous, anxious, or uneasy. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. I was a bundle of nerves before the driving test started. She was a bundle of nerves as she took the stage to sing.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle (someone) into (something)

1. To dress someone, typically a child, in heavy winter clothing or outerwear. It's freezing out, so bundle Janie into her parka, scarf, and boots—and don't forget her hat and gloves!
2. To help someone, typically a child, get into bed. When you bundle Janie into bed, don't forget her teddy bear.
See also: bundle

a bundle of nerves

Someone who is very nervous, anxious, or uneasy. I was a bundle of nerves before the driving test started. Look at that poor bundle of nerves over there. She's so anxious she's shaking.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle off

1. To wrap something up tightly before moving or sending it to another person or place. A noun can be used between "bundle" and "off." Don't worry, I bundled off the picture frames before packing them in the box.
2. To leave a place hastily. A noun can be used between "bundle" and "off." A: "I didn't see Alice this morning. B: "Oh, she bundled off because she was running late."
3. To send someone somewhere, usually hastily. A noun can be used between "bundle" and "off." Unfortunately, I had to bundle my wailing son off to my sister so that I wouldn't miss my flight.
See also: bundle, off

bundle up

1. To dress oneself or another (typically a child) into heavy winter clothing or outerwear. A noun can be used between "bundle" and "up." It's freezing out, so bundle Janie up in her parka, scarf, and boots—and don't forget her hat and gloves! I bundled up in many layers before I went out to shovel the snow.
2. To wrap something up tightly before moving or sending it to another person or place. A noun can be used between "bundle" and "up." Don't worry, I bundled up the picture frames before packing them in the box.
See also: bundle, up

make a bundle

To make a very large amount of money, especially by doing something very successfully. We'll make a bundle if we can manage to secure a trading partner in China. I hear Sarah is making a bundle with sales from her latest novel. When I told him my mother was coming over for dinner, John just made a face and went down to the basement.
See also: bundle, make

drop a bundle

1. To spend a lot of money in an effort to please or entice someone. Even though I dropped a bundle wooing that prospective employee, he turned down our offer.
2. To buy something very expensive. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Wow, they must have dropped a bundle on big, beautiful house like this.
See also: bundle, drop

not go a bundle on (something)

To dislike something. Based on her frown, I suspect that the boss doesn't go a bundle on the idea I came up with.
See also: bundle, not, on

blow a bundle

(on someone) Go to drop a bundle (on someone).
See also: blow, bundle

bundle of joy

 and bundle from heaven
Fig. a baby. We are expecting a bundle of joy next September. When your little bundle from heaven arrives, things will be a little hectic for a while.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle of nerves

a very nervous person. I was a bundle of nerves before my dental appointment.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle off

to leave in a hurry; to take all one's parcels or baggage and leave in a hurry. She got ready and bundled off after her bus. Her arms full, Lily bundled off in a rush.
See also: bundle, off

bundle (oneself) up (against something)

to wrap oneself up in protective clothing or bedding as protection against the cold. Please bundle yourself up against the frigid wind. Bundle up before you go outside.
See also: bundle, up

bundle someone into something

 
1. to put someone, usually a child, into heavy outdoor clothing. Bill bundled Billy into his parka. Tom bundled himself into his parka and opened the door to go out.
2. and bundle someone in to put someone, usually a child, into bed. She bundled Sarah into bed after reading her a story. June pulled the sheets back and bundled Sarah in.
See also: bundle

bundle someone off (to some place)

Fig. to send someone, usually a child, somewhere. Robert bundled the children off to school. They bundled off the kids and were able to relax.
See also: bundle, off

bundle someone up (in something)

to wrap someone up in protective clothing or bedding. Bill bundled Billy up in his parka. Bill bundled up Mary in her parka.
See also: bundle, up

bundle someone up (in something)

to wrap someone up in protective clothing or bedding. Bill bundled Billy up in his parka. Bill bundled up Mary in her parka.
See also: bundle, up

bundle something off (to someone or some place)

to send something off in a bundle to someone. He bundled his laundry off to his mother, who would wash it for him. Mary bundled off the package to her brother.
See also: bundle, off

drop a bundle

(on someone) and blow a bundle (on someone ) Inf. to spend a lot of money pleasing or entertaining someone. I blew a bundle on the candidate, and it didn't help me at all. Over the years, I've dropped a bundle on clients at that restaurant.
See also: bundle, drop

drop a bundle (on something)

Inf. to pay a lot of money for something. Pete dropped a bundle on this car. I always buy old used cars. I've never dropped a bundle on any car.
See also: bundle, drop

lose a bundle

Sl. to lose a lot of money. Don lost a bundle on that land purchase. I know I would lose a bundle if I went to a casino and gambled.
See also: bundle, lose

make a bundle

 and make a pile
to make a lot of money. John really made a bundle on that deal. I'd like to make a pile and retire.
See also: bundle, make

save a bundle (on something)

Fig. to save a lot of money on the purchase of something. I managed to save a bundle on a car by buying a used one.
See also: bundle, save

bundle of nerves

Extremely jittery, tense, or fearful person, as in For months after the accident, Aunt Jane was a bundle of nerves. [1930s]
See also: bundle, nerve, of

make a bundle

Also, make a pile. Make a great deal of money, as in When the market went up they made a bundle, or He made a pile from that department store. The first term, dating from about 1900, comes from the somewhat earlier use of bundle for a roll of banknotes. The variant, alluding to a heap of money, was first recorded in 1864.
See also: bundle, make

a bundle of joy

INFORMAL
A bundle of joy is a baby, especially one that has just been born. Our family are all as overjoyed as we are at the early arrival of our little bundle of joy.
See also: bundle, joy, of

drop your bundle

mainly AUSTRALIAN, INFORMAL
If someone drops their bundle, they lose all hope or lose control of their emotions. At 25-6 University were losing badly, but to their credit they did not drop their bundle. If I had dropped my bundle, it would have hurt a lot of people.
See also: bundle, drop

a bundle of nerves

BRITISH, AMERICAN or

a bag of nerves

BRITISH
If you say that someone is a bundle of nerves or a bag of nerves, you mean that they are extremely nervous. What's the matter? You're a bundle of nerves! Elaine admits she was a bag of nerves when she had to sing in front of the queen.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

bundle off

v.
1. To send something somewhere or to someone in a tightly wrapped package: Bundle off those boxes of books for storage in the attic. I bundled my laundry off to the cleaners.
2. To send someone to some place, especially in a hurry or without his or her consent: She bundled the kids off to their grandparents' house for the holiday.
3. bundle off to To depart for some place: I bundled off to catch my flight.
See also: bundle, off

bundle up

v.
1. To gather or tie something together in a tight package: He bundled up his belongings and left for college. She bundled her manuscript up and sent it to the publisher.
2. To wrap someone snugly in warm clothes or blankets: She bundled up the baby and laid him in the crib. He bundled the kids up and sent them out to play in the snow.
3. To dress snugly in warm clothes or blankets: I bundled up and went outside.
See also: bundle, up

bundle

n. a large amount of money. (see also lose a bundle, make a bundle, package.) He still has a bundle from the sale of his house.

bundle of joy

and bundle from heaven
n. a baby. We are expecting a bundle of joy next September. Robert, your little bundle from heaven smells like a saddle bag from the other place.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle from heaven

verb
See also: bundle, heaven

bundle of nerves

n. a very nervous person. I’m just a bundle of nerves. I wish this were over.
See also: bundle, nerve, of

drop a bundle (on someone)

tv. to spend a lot of money pleasing or entertaining someone. I dropped a bundle on the candidate, and it didn’t help me at all.
See also: bundle, drop, on

drop a bundle

verb
See also: bundle, drop

drop a bundle (on something)

tv. to pay a lot of money for something. Pete dropped a bundle on this car.
See also: bundle, drop, on, something

drop a bundle

verb
See also: bundle, drop

lose a bundle

tv. to lose a lot of money. (see also bundle. Compare this with make a bundle.) Don lost a bundle on that land purchase.
See also: bundle, lose

make a bundle

and make a pile
tv. to make a lot of money. (see also bundle.) She made a bundle on a website investment. I want to buy a few stocks and make a pile in a few years.
See also: bundle, make

bundle of joy

A baby.
See also: bundle, joy, of

bundle of nerves

An extremely nervous person.
See also: bundle, nerve, of
References in classic literature ?
I did up the bundle fast--fast, though my hands trembled.
I have recovered the child, women," I said, as I undid the bundle.
Jacob fell into a dead sleep, at last, without having his arms round David, who paid the reckoning, took his bundle, and walked off.
Five weeks since, I was just like yourself," continued Rogojin, addressing the prince, "with nothing but a bundle and the clothes I wore.
Then once more she would cuddle the warm, little bundle close to her throbbing heart.
Slipping the key into the pocket of his tunic and covering the bundle with his long surcoat, De Vac stepped out into the darkness of the alley and hastened toward the dock.
With that Uncle Alec slipped round to the front of the tent and, casting in the big bundle like a bomb-shell, roared out, in a voice of thunder
And she rubbed the whole bundle of matches quickly against the wall, for she wanted to be quite sure of keeping her grandmother near her.
At his request I next collected the other papers--that is to say, the bundle of letters, the unfinished book and the volumes of the Diary-- and enclosed them all in one wrapper, sealed with my own seal.
It was no sooner said but I stepped into the shop, and with my back to the wench, as if I had stood up for a cart that was going by, I put my hand behind me and took the bundle, and went off with it, the maid or the fellow not perceiving me, or any one else.
said Mr Dorrit, with a glance at the offending bundle he had anathematised.
He had a crust of bread, a coarse shirt, and two pairs of stockings, in his bundle.
He then saw a slouching man of forbidding appearance standing in the midst of the school, with a bundle under his arm; and saw that it was Riderhood.
Holmes took a swift glance round, and then pounced upon a sodden bundle tied together with cord which lay where it had been thrust under the writing table.
In the red glow from the fire-box, a group of people stood huddled together on the platform, encumbered by bundles and boxes.