bunch

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a bunch of baloney

Falsehoods, nonsense, or foolishness. Baloney in this sense might have originated from the word "blarney," which means flattering or nonsensical talk; more usually it refers to bologna sausage, which is blended from different meats, therefore implying content of inferior or dubious quality. Primarily heard in US. You're going to give me $5,000 if I sign the lease today? What a bunch of baloney.
See also: baloney, bunch, of

a bunch of malarkey

Exaggerated, foolish, or untruthful talk; nonsense or falsehoods. Personally, I think the notion of "love at first sight" is a bunch of malarkey.
See also: bunch, malarkey, of

bad bunch

A group of people typified by immoral, illegal, or illicit behavior, which is often seen as being corruptive and/or destructive to others. My brother was a straight-A student until he started hanging out with a bad bunch; now he's hooked on drugs and has dropped out of school.
See also: bad, bunch

best of the bunch

The most excellent, ideal, desirable, or preferable person or thing within a given group. There were several cars on display that caught my eye, but this one is definitely the best of the bunch. Mary hangs out with many talented and intelligent kids, but to me, she will always be the best of the bunch.
See also: bunch, of

get (one's) panties in a bunch

To become overly upset or emotional over something, especially that which is trivial or unimportant. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Ah, don't get your panties in a bunch, I'll have the car back by tomorrow morning! In my opinion, people are getting their panties in a bunch over this election.
See also: bunch, get, panties

it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch

It only takes one person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, it takes just one bad apple to spoil the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. It takes one bad apple to spoil the whole bunch, unfortunately.
See also: apple, bad, bunch, one, spoil, take

one bad apple spoils the (whole) bunch

It only takes one person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, just one bad apple spoils the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. One bad apple spoils the whole bunch, unfortunately.
See also: apple, bad, bunch, one, spoil

pick of the bunch

The best or most ideal option in a group. Matt is the pick of the bunch, so we need to make sure he ends up on our team. I know you think that puppy is too small, but to me he's just the pick of the bunch!
See also: bunch, of, pick

be the best of a bad bunch

To be slightly better or more desirable than anything or anyone else in a group, even though none of the available options are desirable. To be honest, none of the apartments we can afford looked very nice, but this place seems to be the best of a bad bunch. I don't care for Mary's new college friends. She's still the best of a bad bunch, but she's become a real troublemaker since meeting them.
See also: bad, bunch, of

a bunch of fives

slang A fist. That kid is in the nurse's office with a bloody nose because the bully gave him a bunch of fives in the face.
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch up

1. To form or accumulate into a group, cluster, or mass or some kind. A noun can be used between "bunch" and "up" or after "up." It was so cold out that we all bunched up together for warmth. The blanket is still bunched up on that side—can you smooth it out?
2. To crumple something. A noun can be used between "bunch" and "up" or after "up." Don't bunch up your dress in your arms like that!
See also: bunch, up

best of a bad bunch

A person or thing in a group that is slightly better or more desirable than anything or anyone else in the group, even though none of the options available are desirable. To be honest, none of the apartments we can afford looked very nice, but this place seems to be the best of a bad bunch. I don't care for Mary's new college friends. She's still the best of a bad bunch, but she's become a real troublemaker since meeting them.
See also: bad, bunch, of

bunch of fives

Sl. a punch from a closed fist. How would you like a bunch of fives right in the kisser? He ended up with a bunch of fives in the gut.
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch someone or something up

to pack or cluster things or people together. Bunch them up so you can squeeze them into the sack. Kelly bunched up the roses and put them in a vase.
See also: bunch, up

bunch up

to pack together or cluster. Spread out. Don't bunch up!
See also: bunch, up

thanks a bunch

Inf. thanks. Thanks a bunch for your help. He said "thanks a bunch" and walked out.
See also: bunch, thanks

bunch of fives

1 a fist. 2 a punch. British informal
See also: bunch, five, of

the best of a bad ˈbunch/ˈlot

(British English) a person or a thing that is a little better than the rest in a group, although none are very good
See also: bad, bunch, lot, of

a bunch of ˈfives

(old-fashioned or humorous) a punch (= a hard hit made with a closed hand)
See also: bunch, five, of

a ˌmixed ˈbag/ˈbunch

(informal) a group of people or things of different types or of different abilities: The entries to the competition were a real mixed bag — some excellent, some awful.This year’s students are rather a mixed bunch.
See also: bag, bunch, mixed

the pick of the ˈbunch

(informal) the best example of a group of people or things: This Australian wine is the pick of the bunch.
See also: bunch, of, pick

bunch up

v.
1. To move close together to form a tight group; cluster: The kids bunched up in a corner of the room, whispering to each other.
2. To pack some people or things together tightly: Bunch up the blankets and stuff them into the bag. I didn't like what I had written on the page, so I bunched it up and threw it out.
3. To come together or be more concentrated in one place: The cloth bunches up at the cuff of my shirt.
See also: bunch, up

bunch of fives

n. the fist. How would you like a bunch of fives right in the kisser?
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch-punch

1. n. an act of serial copulation with one female and a group of males. Sam always dreamed about being involved in a bunch-punch.
2. n. an act of group rape of a woman. There was a bunch-punch in this neighborhood last night, and the night before, and the night before that. Where are the police?

thanks a bunch

phr. thanks. Thanks a bunch for your help.
See also: bunch, thanks

a whole bunch

and whole bunches
mod. a whole lot; very much. (Always with a in the singular.) I like to spend evenings at home a whole bunch. Tom likes Mary whole bunches, but she thinks he’s a dork.
See also: bunch, whole

whole bunches

verb
See also: bunch, whole
References in periodicals archive ?
The fact that minority children were the most knowledgeable about illicit drugs and were more likely to have appropriate feelings about Bunchy sipping beer warrants further investigation.
John and Bunchy were students on campus and were asking other students in Campbell Hall, where the EOP office was located, to support the person we wanted.
As a matter of fact, Bunchy Carter politicized the Renegade Slausen street gang, which was a very famous community entity, and brought many of them into the party.
The key themes of radical criminology, in this sense, were not abstract ideas, but rather an analysis of historical relations rooted in the daily experiences of the period; when radical criminologists like Paul Takagi analyzed police killings of Black men as a feature of a "garrison state," for example, their study was rooted in the governmentally facilitated killings of Black Panther Party members like Bobby Hutton in Oakland, John Huggins and Bunchy Carter in Los Angeles, and Fred Hampton and Mark Clark in Chicago (Takagi 1974, 29).
He said the growers have been educated through field days, seminars as well as print media to control Bunchy Top Virus disease.
Infestation of 4 cultivars with 10 pink hibiscus mealybug females and their egg sac did not result in the expression of bunchy top feeding symptoms on all plants.
Despite a continuing fight with banana bunchy top disease on the eastern end of the island and a couple of failed papaya crops, the future of Kauai's agriculture industry looks bright.
Queensland scientists are tackling one of the worlds worst threats to banana crops bunchy top disease - with help from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.
Research into the bunchy top virus is another way the Palaszczuk Government is continuing to advance Queensland by supporting our world-class researchers.
Aphids spread the bunchy top virus, causing stunted plants with bunchy leaves at the top and deformed fruit.
However, he wanted to invite the other members of the Donovan family, including Mickey (Jon Voight), Terry (Eddie Marsan) and Bunchy (Dash Mihok).
Because Ray, Abby, Mickey, Bunchy and Terry have issues with each other, the party, which was done at the Donovans' house, is filled with tension.
Fred Hampton, Bunchy Carter, George Jackson, and others.
For example, about three weeks ago we learned that we got banana bunchy top disease.