bunch

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a bunch of baloney

Falsehoods, nonsense, or foolishness. Baloney in this sense might have originated from the word "blarney," which means flattering or nonsensical talk; more usually it refers to bologna sausage, which is blended from different meats, therefore implying content of inferior or dubious quality. Primarily heard in US. You're going to give me $5,000 if I sign the lease today? What a bunch of baloney.
See also: baloney, bunch, of

a bunch of malarkey

Exaggerated, foolish, or untruthful talk; nonsense or falsehoods. Personally, I think the notion of "love at first sight" is a bunch of malarkey.
See also: bunch, malarkey, of

bad bunch

A group of people typified by immoral, illegal, or illicit behavior, which is often seen as being corruptive and/or destructive to others. My brother was a straight-A student until he started hanging out with a bad bunch; now he's hooked on drugs and has dropped out of school.
See also: bad, bunch

best of the bunch

The most excellent, ideal, desirable, or preferable person or thing within a given group. There were several cars on display that caught my eye, but this one is definitely the best of the bunch. Mary hangs out with many talented and intelligent kids, but to me, she will always be the best of the bunch.
See also: bunch, of

get (one's) panties in a bunch

To become overly upset or emotional over something, especially that which is trivial or unimportant. Primarily heard in US, South Africa. Ah, don't get your panties in a bunch, I'll have the car back by tomorrow morning! In my opinion, people are getting their panties in a bunch over this election.
See also: bunch, get, panties

it takes one bad apple to spoil the (whole) bunch

It only takes one person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, it takes just one bad apple to spoil the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. It takes one bad apple to spoil the whole bunch, unfortunately.
See also: apple, bad, bunch, one, spoil, take

one bad apple spoils the (whole) bunch

It only takes one person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, just one bad apple spoils the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. One bad apple spoils the whole bunch, unfortunately.
See also: apple, bad, bunch, one, spoil

pick of the bunch

The best or most ideal option in a group. Matt is the pick of the bunch, so we need to make sure he ends up on our team. I know you think that puppy is too small, but to me he's just the pick of the bunch!
See also: bunch, of, pick

be the best of a bad bunch

To be slightly better or more desirable than anything or anyone else in a group, even though none of the available options are desirable. To be honest, none of the apartments we can afford looked very nice, but this place seems to be the best of a bad bunch. I don't care for Mary's new college friends. She's still the best of a bad bunch, but she's become a real troublemaker since meeting them.
See also: bad, bunch, of

a bunch of fives

slang A fist. That kid is in the nurse's office with a bloody nose because the bully gave him a bunch of fives in the face.
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch up

1. To form or accumulate into a group, cluster, or mass or some kind. A noun can be used between "bunch" and "up" or after "up." It was so cold out that we all bunched up together for warmth. The blanket is still bunched up on that side—can you smooth it out?
2. To crumple something. A noun can be used between "bunch" and "up" or after "up." Don't bunch up your dress in your arms like that!
See also: bunch, up

best of a bad bunch

A person or thing in a group that is slightly better or more desirable than anything or anyone else in the group, even though none of the options available are desirable. To be honest, none of the apartments we can afford looked very nice, but this place seems to be the best of a bad bunch. I don't care for Mary's new college friends. She's still the best of a bad bunch, but she's become a real troublemaker since meeting them.
See also: bad, bunch, of

a whole bunch

A lot. I liked that movie a whole bunch—it was great. He says that he likes me a whole bunch, but not enough to date me, apparently.
See also: bunch, whole

bunch punch

1. vulgar slang A sexual encounter between one woman and multiple men.
2. vulgar slang The rape of a woman carried out by multiple men.
See also: bunch, punch

one rotten apple spoils the (whole) bunch

1. Proverb It only takes one bad person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, one rotten apple spoils the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. One rotten apple spoils the whole bunch, unfortunately.
2. Proverb The criminal, unethical, corrupt, or otherwise negative behavior of a single person will spread to other people around them. Ever since that crook took over as CEO, the company has been backsliding into shadier and shadier business arrangements. One rotten apple really does spoil the bunch. A: "Is it any wonder? When corrupt liars take office, suddenly everyone who benefits from them starts to believe—and spread—their lies to maintain the status quo." B: "It's true, then, that one rotten apple spoils the whole bunch."
See also: apple, bunch, one, rotten, spoil

a rotten apple spoils the (whole) bunch

1. Proverb It only takes one bad person, thing, element, etc., to ruin the entire group, situation, project, etc. Refers to the fact that a rotting apple can cause other apples in close proximity to begin to rot as well. A: "It used to be considered the top research facility in the region, but after one of its researchers was discovered to have plagiarized a number of his papers, the whole department's reputation has been dragged through the mud." B: "Well, a rotten apple spoils the bunch." I really loved my job, but there was this one jerk there who made life miserable for everyone. One rotten apple spoils the whole bunch, unfortunately.
2. Proverb The criminal, unethical, corrupt, or otherwise negative behavior of a single person will spread to other people around them. Ever since that crook took over as CEO, the company has been backsliding into shadier and shadier business arrangements. A rotten apple really does spoil the bunch. A: "Is it any wonder? When corrupt liars take office, suddenly everyone who benefits from them starts to believe—and spread—their lies to maintain the status quo." B: "It's true, then, that a rotten apple spoils the whole bunch."
See also: apple, bunch, rotten, spoil

thank you a bunch

An informal set phrase expressing a lot of gratitude to someone for something. A: "Your mom and I got you a new laptop for college." B: "Oh wow, thank you a bunch, Dad!" A: "Here's that book you asked for, Tom." B: "Thank you a bunch, Sarah."
See also: bunch, thank

thanks a bunch

An informal set phrase expressing a lot of gratitude to someone for something. A: "Your mom and I got you a new laptop for college." B: "Oh wow, thanks a bunch, Dad!" A: "Here's that book you asked for, Tom." B: "Thanks a bunch, Sarah."
See also: bunch, thanks

bunch of fives

Sl. a punch from a closed fist. How would you like a bunch of fives right in the kisser? He ended up with a bunch of fives in the gut.
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch someone or something up

to pack or cluster things or people together. Bunch them up so you can squeeze them into the sack. Kelly bunched up the roses and put them in a vase.
See also: bunch, up

bunch up

to pack together or cluster. Spread out. Don't bunch up!
See also: bunch, up

thanks a bunch

Inf. thanks. Thanks a bunch for your help. He said "thanks a bunch" and walked out.
See also: bunch, thanks

bunch of fives

1 a fist. 2 a punch. British informal
See also: bunch, five, of

the best of a bad ˈbunch/ˈlot

(British English) a person or a thing that is a little better than the rest in a group, although none are very good
See also: bad, bunch, lot, of

a bunch of ˈfives

(old-fashioned or humorous) a punch (= a hard hit made with a closed hand)
See also: bunch, five, of

a ˌmixed ˈbag/ˈbunch

(informal) a group of people or things of different types or of different abilities: The entries to the competition were a real mixed bag — some excellent, some awful.This year’s students are rather a mixed bunch.
See also: bag, bunch, mixed

the pick of the ˈbunch

(informal) the best example of a group of people or things: This Australian wine is the pick of the bunch.
See also: bunch, of, pick

bunch up

v.
1. To move close together to form a tight group; cluster: The kids bunched up in a corner of the room, whispering to each other.
2. To pack some people or things together tightly: Bunch up the blankets and stuff them into the bag. I didn't like what I had written on the page, so I bunched it up and threw it out.
3. To come together or be more concentrated in one place: The cloth bunches up at the cuff of my shirt.
See also: bunch, up

bunch of fives

n. the fist. How would you like a bunch of fives right in the kisser?
See also: bunch, five, of

bunch-punch

1. n. an act of serial copulation with one female and a group of males. Sam always dreamed about being involved in a bunch-punch.
2. n. an act of group rape of a woman. There was a bunch-punch in this neighborhood last night, and the night before, and the night before that. Where are the police?

thanks a bunch

phr. thanks. Thanks a bunch for your help.
See also: bunch, thanks

a whole bunch

and whole bunches
mod. a whole lot; very much. (Always with a in the singular.) I like to spend evenings at home a whole bunch. Tom likes Mary whole bunches, but she thinks he’s a dork.
See also: bunch, whole

whole bunches

verb
See also: bunch, whole
References in periodicals archive ?
Samples of five bunches per plot were analyzed at the Laboratory of Post-Harvest Physiology -Embrapa Semiarido, for the determination of the following fruit quality variables: berry mass (g), by weighing in semi-analytical scale; pulp firmness (N), obtained in electronic texturometer with a 2 mm diameter tip; SS content ([degrees]Brix), obtained in Abbe bench-type digital refractometer (AOAC, 1992); soluble sugar content (g.100 [g.sup.-1]), quantified from the anthrone reactive, according to Yemn and Willis (1954); TA (% tartaric acid), determined by titration in 0.1 M NaOH solution (AOAC, 1992); and total extractable polyphenols (mg.100 [g.sup.-1]), extracted and quantified using the Folin-Ciocalteau reagent, as recommended by Larrauri et al.
Bunches covered from Khalal stage to the time the weather conditions became suitable with mat baskets, plastic bags, hemp bags and cloth net bags.
Subject to availability, 20,000 bunches available, distributed on a first come, first served basis.
The new biomass plants will use these leftover-disposable palm bunches as renewable energy source to generate the output of a 10,000kW small-scale electric power plant.
Honey Bunches of Oats is one of the five top-selling brand-name cereals (along with Cheerios, Honey Nut Cheerios, Frosted Flakes, and Frosted Mini-Wheats).
The flowers died very quickly, while the 39p bunches of daffodils I bought at Lidl on Saturday are still beautiful!
Repeat, layering bunches until you reach the cord's end.
People who have been involved in a community for a long time may only see the same damn bunch of people, but the number of 'bunches' that are out there may be surprising.
In a multi-national effort a team of researchers from DESY, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and other institutes have demonstrated a remarkable feature of self-organisation in a particle beam that can be of great use for a future generation of compact accelerators: Using the high quality electron beam at DESYs PITZ facility, the scientists could show that long electron bunches can chop themselves into a row of shorter bunches when they fly through a cloud of electrically charged gas, called a plasma.
Studies carried out in several regions of the world have shown the need for at least 7 (RAMIREZ et al., 2008), 7 to 9 (VARGAS et al., 2009) and up to 12 (GONZALEZ et al., 2012) functional and healthy leaves at the time of flowering for the adequate filling of fruits in bunches of Cavendish banana trees.
Lay it on thick Once you've made several of these bunches or posies, use the remaining wire to secure them in turn to the wreath.
Marks & Spencer had a bunch for pounds 2.99, while Waitrose were offering two bunches of tulips or daffodils for pounds 5.
Astral and Bunches.co.uk have got 25 tubs of Astral's All-over Moisturiser to give away, along with a Bunches bouquet.
Wire more bunches to the ring, covering the stems of the previously attached bunches as you go.