bump along the bottom

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bump along the bottom

To be in poor condition and show no improvement. Typically used to describe economic issues. Without major changes, the economy will still be bumping along the bottom for many years to come.
See also: bottom, bump
References in periodicals archive ?
I've found that wrasse will happily chase soft plastic lures bumping along the bottom. I've also discovered experimenting with your lure colour can do the trick as wrasse can be picky about the colour they want to attack.
Someone who can keep this economic wasteland bumping along the bottom.
They also questioned the business performance of ACL and how a firm "bumping along the bottom" attracted PS14.4m of investment.
She's the blue line bumping along the bottom, but...
Andrew Hagger of moneycomms.co.uk, says: "With mortgage rates still bumping along the bottom but predicted to rise in the next 12 to 18 months, a longer-term fix currently looks attractive.
General Secretary Frances O'Grady said: "The Government's self-defeating austerity plan means that the UK economy could be bumping along the bottom for some time.
The UK economy may be bumping along the bottom but there are still opportunities out there and the entrepreneurs in this area are looking for opportunities.
Mr Whiteside said customers may be suffering from a compound effect of the economy "bumping along the bottom" for some time.
The economy has been "bumping along the bottom" for two years but there are now signs of progress in dealing with problems in the eurozone and the banking system and expectations of lower inflation, Charlie Bean said.
David Jones, from Jones and Redfearn Rhyl estate agent, said: "We are now at the bottom and have been bumping along the bottom for some months now.
They used to be popular in the early 1970s when, like today, the economy was "bumping along the bottom".
Darra Singh, the panel's chairman, summed up this hand-wringing attitude when he said: "There are people 'bumping along the bottom', unable to change their lives.
There are people 'bumping along the bottom', unable to change their lives," said Darra Singh, the panel's chairman.
More than four million Britons have decided to go it alone - a 20-year high - but with the economy still bumping along the bottom it can be a struggle to make money.