Bully for you!

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Bully for you!

Good for you! Well done! Can also be used sarcastically to convey the speaker's annoyance. Primarily heard in UK. I heard you got promoted—bully for you! A: "I'm so excited to have a date to the dance!" B: "Well, bully for you! No one has asked me yet."
See also: bully, for
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

Bully for you!

 
1. an expression that praises someone or someone's courage. (Dated, but still heard.) The audience shouted, "Bravo! Bully for you!" Bob: I quit my job today. Sally: Bully for you! Now what are you going to do? Bob: Well, I need a little loan to tide me over.
2. a sarcastic phrase belittling someone's statement or accomplishment. Bob: I managed to save three dollars last week. Bill: Well, bully for you! Mary: I won a certificate good for a free meal! Sally: Bully for you!
See also: bully, for
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

bully for —!

well done!; good for (you, them, etc.)!
This expression takes its origin from the US colloquial sense of bully meaning ‘first-rate’, recorded since the mid 19th century.
See also: bully, for
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bully for somebody!

(spoken) used to show that you do not think that what somebody has said or done is very impressive: ‘Janet’s just won a free holiday in Spain.’ ‘Oh, bully for her! She’s so rich anyway, she can afford to go away whenever she wants to.’
See also: bully, for
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

bully for you/him/her/them

Good for you/him/her/them. This term uses the adjective “bully” in the sense of “fine” or “excellent,” a largely British usage. It became popular in the United States during the Civil War but is heard less often today and may be heading toward obsolescence. Tristan Jones had it in Ice (1977), “Bully for him. Was there free booze?”
See also: bully, for
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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