bulk bill

bulk bill

To charge the costs of a patient's care by a general practitioner, hospital, or other health service provider to Medicare, the Australian government's universal health insurance system. Primarily heard in Australia. Recent legislation is aimed at introducing a mandatory co-pay for all services bulk billed by GPs and hospitals.
See also: bill, bulk
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The market will be driven by reversal to cuts in Bulk Bill incentives, implementation of national screening programs and rising trend of outsourcing by public hospitals to private service providers.
In 2017, Commercial Bank became the first bank in Qatar to offer direct debit to any utility company (Qatar Cool) for online bill payments, and the first bank in Qatar to offer a bulk bill payment service to Ooredoo.
In 2017, the bank became the first bank in the country to offer "direct debit" to any utility company (Qatar Cool) for online bill payments, and the first bank in Qatar to offer a bulk bill payment service to Ooredoo.
The bulk bill lacks any data intelligence as to the itemized cost of the relationship.
Alternatively, the doctor could chose to bulk bill the patient, in which case the patient would pay nothing and the doctor would bill the government directly for the 85 percent rebate.
Medicare Plus promised to rectify these problems by recruiting more doctors and, at the same time, giving them additional financial inducements to bulk bill families with young children and residents of regional areas.
Many rail against long waiting lines for "elective" surgery in public hospitals, understaffed and underfunded public hospitals, and a lack of doctors who "bulk bill"--that is, bill Medicare directly for services, requiring no out-of-pocket fees from patients.
TCP encourages the involvement of local GPs, most of whom bulk bill pensioners.
The average amount paid by those people not bulk billed was $28.58 per visit.
There is also evidence that low income might also reduce access to specialist medical practitioner services which, while funded through Medicare, are less likely to be bulk billed than general practitioner services, and which therefore attract higher out-of pocket costs.