buggy

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drive (someone) buggy

1. To upset, irritate, or annoy someone to the point of distraction. It drives me buggy seeing all these people just staring at their phones all day long. Would you stop shouting, you're driving me buggy!
2. To cause someone to become unhinged, insane, or mentally unstable. All that pressure finally drove Steve buggy in the end. You kids are going to drive me buggy one of these days with all of your arguing.
See also: buggy, drive

thanks for the buggy ride

old-fashioned Thank you for the good times. Used when ending a romantic relationship. "Buggy ride" is possibly a euphemism for sexual relations. A: "I just think it's best that we start seeing other people." B: "Well, thanks for the buggy ride, I guess."
See also: buggy, ride, thanks

struggle buggy

1. slang, dated One's car when used as a place for sexual activity. Primarily heard in US. The spot is a favorite location of young lovers looking to park their struggle buggies for a late-night romp. I knew he was just trying to tempt me into the backseat of his struggle buggy, but he was so handsome that I couldn't say no!
2. slang, old-fashioned A car that is especially old and in poor condition—that is, one that struggles to run properly. Sometimes hyphenated. Primarily heard in US. I can't believe you drove down the entire West Coast in that old struggle buggy—it's a miracle you even made it! I'm finally trading in my struggle-buggy for a newer model.
See also: buggy, struggle

go the way of the dodo

 and go the way of the horse and buggy
Fig. to become extinct; to become obsolete. The floppy disc has gone the way of the horse and buggy.
See also: dodo, of, way

horse and buggy

 and horse and carriage; buggy whip
Fig. a carriage pulled by a horse, as opposed to a modern automobile; the horse was urged on with a whip. (A symbol of old-fashionedness or out-of-dateness. Particularly with go out with, as in the examples.) That kind of clothing went out with the horse and buggy. I thought suspenders went out with the horse and carriage, but I see them everywhere now.
See also: and, buggy, horse

thanks for the buggy ride

used as a way of thanking someone for their help. North American dated
A buggy was a light horse-drawn vehicle for one or two people.
See also: buggy, ride, thanks

buggy

(ˈbəgi)
n. an automobile. Other than a dent in the front bumper, this buggy is in A-1 condition.

struggle buggy

The backseat of a car. This early- and mid-20th-century expression described an auto whose young owner tried to seduce unwilling young women into its backseat for a little (one of the euphemisms for the activity was “backseat boogie”). As the sophomoric joke went, “I call my car the Mayflower because so many Puritans came across in it.”
See also: buggy, struggle
References in periodicals archive ?
BUGNET editor Bruce Brown on Microsoft's escalating quality problems: "Every major iteration of Windows has been buggier than the one before.
It is faster than P3 by a factor of about three, but it is also buggier than its predecessor.
Coupling its buggier looks is the new Suzuki Heartect platform, which is lighter and stiffer than before.
One of the buggier entries in the 18th annual sand castle competition, hosted by the American Institute of Architects/LA, featured a giant caterpillar extended along a calendar taking a sizable bite out of the Y2K bug, symbolized by a computer keyboard.
Dust devils - the bane of the buggier because they can foul kite lines beyond all hope of straightening - spin mesmerizing funnels across the tan, cracked flats.
Kite buggiers are the daredevils of the bunch, intrepid individuals who want to take their hobby to a higher level.