bugger off


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bugger off

Get out of here; go away; get lost. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, New Zealand. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just bugger off and leave me alone!
See also: bugger, off
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

bugger off

v. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command.
See also: bugger, off
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

bug/bugger off

Leave, get out of here. The American usage is mainly the first, the British the second. Both are slang and rude, especially given another meaning of “bugger” (sodomize), and both have been in use since at least 1900. James Joyce wrote, “Here, bugger off, Harry. There’s the cops” (Ulysses, 1922).
See also: bug, bugger, off
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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