bugger


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bugger all

Nothing or next to nothing. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, New Zealand. I've been working on this project for three months straight, and I've got bugger all to show for it! Quit lecturing me, you know bugger all about the issue.
See also: all, bugger

bugger off

Get out of here; go away; get lost. Primarily heard in UK, Australia, New Zealand. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just bugger off and leave me alone!
See also: bugger, off

bug off

slang Get out of here; go away; get lost. Listen, I don't want to buy any, so why don't you just bug off and leave me alone!
See also: bug, off

play silly buggers

To act in a foolish, irritating, or reckless manner. Primarily heard in UK, Australia. It's no wonder that we lost the game, with all of you playing silly buggers out here instead of training like professionals. I wouldn't be surprised if we end up in another war with the way the two countries' leaders have been playing silly buggers recently.
See also: bugger, play, silly

bugger me

An exclamation of surprise or astonishment. Primarily heard in UK. Well, bugger me—I had no idea you guys would be here tonight too!
See also: bugger

bug off

 
1. Sl. to cease bothering [someone]. Hey, bug off! Your comments are annoying. I wish you would bug off!
2. Sl. Get out!; Go away! (Usually Bug off!) Bug off! Get out of my sight! Bug off and leave me alone!
See also: bug, off

bug off

Also, bugger off. Go away, as in Bug off before I call the police. Both terms are often used as an imperative, as in the example, and the variant is heard more in Britain than in America. [Slang; c. 1900] For a synonym, see buzz off.
See also: bug, off

bugger all

nothing.
See also: all, bugger

bugger me

used to express surprise or amazement.
See also: bugger

play silly buggers

act in a foolish way.
See also: bugger, play, silly

play ˈsilly buggers (with something)

(British English, informal) behave in a stupid and annoying way: Stop playing silly buggers and answer the question.
See also: bugger, play, silly

bug off

v. Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command: Bug off! I'm trying to get some work done.
See also: bug, off

bugger off

v. Chiefly British Vulgar Slang
To go away. Used chiefly as a command.
See also: bugger, off

bug/bugger off

Leave, get out of here. The American usage is mainly the first, the British the second. Both are slang and rude, especially given another meaning of “bugger” (sodomize), and both have been in use since at least 1900. James Joyce wrote, “Here, bugger off, Harry. There’s the cops” (Ulysses, 1922).
See also: bug, bugger, off
References in periodicals archive ?
That's the sort of thing that happens when you play "silly buggers" and get it wrong.
Trust me when I say a buggered up screw can be become a worse condition if the improper tact is used.
Why does it only take a few days to pile on the pounds but WEEKS of hard work to get rid of the little buggers? Ruth Langsford What an amazing weekend I've had...
From marking camps, finding your way back, identifying good guys, finding your downed game or a zillion other uses, these little buggers really rock.
Getting the buggers into science (How to motivate students in biology, chemistry, physics and investigations)
They present a future where a global government trains gifted young children from around the world in the art of interstellar warfare, hoping to find a leader whose skills can prevent a second attack upon humanity by the insect-like aliens descriptively nicknamed "buggers."
"Woolly Wisdom: How To Tie And Fish Woolly Worms, Woolly Buggers, And Their Fish-Catching Kin" by fly-fishing expert Gary Soucie is a superbly presented 'how to' guide to creating a special class of versatile and popular fishing flies that are experienced proven at catching fishing.
"Those little buggers really know what's happening!"
Bites from these little buggers spread a disease called leishmaniasis.
Sigel quotes a bawdy verse in which Prime Minister Gladstone "buggers" a Turk in a "grand demonstration" of his "prick" (p.
Harmful buggers? The bacteria's DNA (genetic material) showed that most of the organisms were related to one of two types of opportunistic bacteria.
The advert for the company's teaching guides reads 'Don't Let the Buggers Get You Down' in reference to its series of teaching guides with titles such as 'Getting the Buggers to Write', 'Getting the Buggers to Read' and 'Getting the Buggers to Think'.
Chapter 1, titled "Shakespeare's Beastly Buggers," is, says Boehrer, about women; but it is much more about the fluid boundaries between animals and humans.
Like many craftsmen/business owners, Jessica Grossman began Little Buggers as a hobby.